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Poe; Eels

Presented by Goldenvoice. Bands: (Poe) Poe, Cameron Stone, Toby Skard, Daris Adkins, Jones; (eels) Mike Edwards, Tommy Walter, Butch Norton. Reviewed Oct. 27 , 1996. At 26, singer-songwriter Poe has seen a lot of contradiction in her short life. She grew up at various international ports of call with her world-traveling, filmmaking father, Tad Danielewski. She spent her teens in Utah , where she was one of six non-Mormons in her school. After high school, she squatted in a condemned Lower East Side building before finally settling on attending Princeton and following her dreams of making music. All of which leads to the Roxy, where, at the first of three sold-out shows Sunday, Poe (born Annie Danielewski) and her band of just 10 months staged a spiritual revival that all but humbled her album and should serve to quiet critics who've pegged the singer little more than the latest Alanis wannabe. Eschewing the sample-heavy tendencies of her debut "Hello" (Modern/Atlantic), Poe and her quartet were unexpectedly aggressive and powerful, relating tales of modern fear and loathing with a sharp sense of detail and purpose. Songs such as the hit "Angry Johnny," which on record feels like a shallow shot at an ex-beau, and "Trigger Happy Jack ," in which the protagonist is the target of a psycho driver, were dramatic highlights of the 45-minute show. Poe doesn't whine about past injustices; she says she overcomes them. Also of note was cellist Cameron Stone, whose amped instrument gave the otherwise standard rock fare a broad, soaring affect. Openers the eels, they of matching yellow hair and that incredible MTV "Buzz Clip" video for "Novocaine For the Soul," were an entertaining if unusual setup to the evening. Led by former solo artist Mike Edwards (who prefers the simple tag E), the group offered a grown-up look at youthful problems such as alienation and self-loathing, but with an oft-missing underlying positivity that separates the trio from many of their inconclusive contemporaries. A reworked version of their radio hit "Novocaine" was a standout, as was "Beautiful Freak," the title track from the band's DreamWorks debut. Also of note were their twisted covers of Prince's "If I was Your Girlfriend" and Sophie B. Hawkins' "Damn, I Wish I was Your Lover," both clever twists on the songs' original meanings. Troy J. Augusto

Presented by Goldenvoice. Bands: (Poe) Poe, Cameron Stone, Toby Skard, Daris Adkins, Jones; (eels) Mike Edwards, Tommy Walter, Butch Norton. Reviewed Oct. 27 , 1996. At 26, singer-songwriter Poe has seen a lot of contradiction in her short life. She grew up at various international ports of call with her world-traveling, filmmaking father, Tad Danielewski. She spent her teens in Utah , where she was one of six non-Mormons in her school. After high school, she squatted in a condemned Lower East Side building before finally settling on attending Princeton and following her dreams of making music. All of which leads to the Roxy, where, at the first of three sold-out shows Sunday, Poe (born Annie Danielewski) and her band of just 10 months staged a spiritual revival that all but humbled her album and should serve to quiet critics who’ve pegged the singer little more than the latest Alanis wannabe. Eschewing the sample-heavy tendencies of her debut “Hello” (Modern/Atlantic), Poe and her quartet were unexpectedly aggressive and powerful, relating tales of modern fear and loathing with a sharp sense of detail and purpose. Songs such as the hit “Angry Johnny,” which on record feels like a shallow shot at an ex-beau, and “Trigger Happy Jack ,” in which the protagonist is the target of a psycho driver, were dramatic highlights of the 45-minute show. Poe doesn’t whine about past injustices; she says she overcomes them. Also of note was cellist Cameron Stone, whose amped instrument gave the otherwise standard rock fare a broad, soaring affect. Openers the eels, they of matching yellow hair and that incredible MTV “Buzz Clip” video for “Novocaine For the Soul,” were an entertaining if unusual setup to the evening. Led by former solo artist Mike Edwards (who prefers the simple tag E), the group offered a grown-up look at youthful problems such as alienation and self-loathing, but with an oft-missing underlying positivity that separates the trio from many of their inconclusive contemporaries. A reworked version of their radio hit “Novocaine” was a standout, as was “Beautiful Freak,” the title track from the band’s DreamWorks debut. Also of note were their twisted covers of Prince’s “If I was Your Girlfriend” and Sophie B. Hawkins’ “Damn, I Wish I was Your Lover,” both clever twists on the songs’ original meanings. Troy J. Augusto

Poe; Eels

(Roxy; 395 capacity; $ 15.50)

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