You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

The Notebook of Trigorin

Stephen Hollis' elegant and generally well-acted Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park production is the U.S. premiere of "Notebook," adapted from Ann Dunnigan's "Seagull" translation about a year before Williams died. The 14-year delay is due to the machinations of Williams' notoriously controlling executor, Maria St. Just. Hollis snagged the rights to the unpublished work after St. Just's death, and Lynn Redgrave (who had turned down previous offers to play Arkadina) jumped at the chance to originate a new Tennessee-style grand dame.

With:
Cast: Jack Cirillo (Medvedenko), Natacha Roi (Masha), Timothy Altmeyer (Constantine), Jed Davis (Yakov), Donald Christopher (Sorin), Jeff Woodman (Trigorin), Stina Nielsen (Nina), Sonja Lanzener (Paulina), Philip Pleasants (Dorn), Alan Mixon (Shamrayev), Lynn Redgrave (Arkadina), John Sharp (Cook), Eleanor B. Shepherd (Old Woman), Poppi Kramer (Maid), Jack Marshall and Bruce Pilkenton (Workers).

Stephen Hollis’ elegant and generally well-acted Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park production is the U.S. premiere of “Notebook,” adapted from Ann Dunnigan’s “Seagull” translation about a year before Williams died. The 14-year delay is due to the machinations of Williams’ notoriously controlling executor, Maria St. Just. Hollis snagged the rights to the unpublished work after St. Just’s death, and Lynn Redgrave (who had turned down previous offers to play Arkadina) jumped at the chance to originate a new Tennessee-style grand dame.

Williams was not so radical as to move the play to New Orleans: The action still takes place in turn-of-the-century Russia, the characters have their original names and the basic plot is preserved. But as the evening progresses, it becomes clear that this is not your father’s Chekhov.

The most remarkable infusion of the Williams sensibility occurs with the character of Trigorin (well played here by Jeff Woodman). In Williams’ adaptation, Trigorin is a youthful 37 and explicitly bisexual. His preference for attractive men provokes a frothy confrontation with Arkadina, during which Trigorin’s traveling companion brandishes a postcard photo of an attractive Sicilian.

Given that Trigorin ultimately impregnates the hapless Nina, Williams had to work hard to make his take on Trigorin fit the plot. Even if the initially sympathetic Trigorin comes off as a sleaze by the end, the sexual references have the interesting effect of extending Chekhov’s cerebral musings on unrequited love into an earthy sexual arena.

There are other significant changes. Williams’ snappier, funnier dialogue is peppered with one-liners, and there are a variety of other theatrical flourishes. In this version, Dr. Dorn (Philip Pleasants) becomes a very nasty fellow, and Chekhov’s philosophical musings are greatly reduced throughout the play. Nina’s child does not die, but rather is adopted by Americans.

And compared with the original text, the overall action appears far more Oedipal. A blend of Amanda Wingfield and Blanche DuBois, Arkadina clearly brings about the play’s tragic ending in which the fading actress goes completely nuts.

The textual meld of the two playwrights’ styles is sometimes uneasy, a problem that’s reflected in the production. The extravagant Redgrave, for example, performs her role in a broad (and period) theatrical style, while Timothy Altmeyer’s awkward Constantine is contemporary, self-reflexive and understated.

Woodman and Pleasants are the most successful at the necessary straddling of the two playwrights’ worlds, perhaps taking their cues from Ming Cho Lee’s beautifully ambivalent set, a black-and-white rendering of trees made colorful by Brian Nason’s lighting design. Candice Donnelly’s costumes provide the final touch Chekhovian with a hint of the Williams languor. And there’s a lot more male skin that one typically finds in “The Seagull.”

The Notebook of Trigorin

Production: A Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park presentation of a play in two acts by Tennessee Williams, adapted from "The Seagull" by Anton Chekhov. Directed by Stephen Hollis.

Crew: Sets, Ming Cho Lee; costumes, Candice Donnelly; lighting, Brian Nason; sound, David B. Smith; production stage manager, Bruce E. Coyle. Artistic director, Ed Stern. Opened Sept. 5, 1996, at the Marx Theater/Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park. Reviewed Sept. 7; 629 seats; $ 34 top. Running time: 2 HOURS, 30 MIN.

With: Cast: Jack Cirillo (Medvedenko), Natacha Roi (Masha), Timothy Altmeyer (Constantine), Jed Davis (Yakov), Donald Christopher (Sorin), Jeff Woodman (Trigorin), Stina Nielsen (Nina), Sonja Lanzener (Paulina), Philip Pleasants (Dorn), Alan Mixon (Shamrayev), Lynn Redgrave (Arkadina), John Sharp (Cook), Eleanor B. Shepherd (Old Woman), Poppi Kramer (Maid), Jack Marshall and Bruce Pilkenton (Workers).With a Southern Gothic sensibility substituting for Chekhovian subtext, Tennessee Williams' free and fascinating adaptation of "The Seagull" would doubtless appear crude to purist admirers of the master of concealed emotion. But working broadly within Chekhov's narrative frame, Williams is surprisingly respectful and creative. This hitherto ignored fusion of two of history's greatest playwrights holds far more than academic interest. "The Notebook of Trigorin" is a crackling and thoroughly entertaining piece of theater that gives a restrained play some sexual (and commercial) sizzle.

More Film

  • Danny Boyle

    Film News Roundup: Danny Boyle's Comedy Moved Forward

    Stephen Hollis’ elegant and generally well-acted Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park production is the U.S. premiere of “Notebook,” adapted from Ann Dunnigan’s “Seagull” translation about a year before Williams died. The 14-year delay is due to the machinations of Williams’ notoriously controlling executor, Maria St. Just. Hollis snagged the rights to the unpublished work after […]

  • Los Angeles Film Festival Tries Awards

    LA Film Festival Looks for Reinvention With Fall Berth

    Stephen Hollis’ elegant and generally well-acted Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park production is the U.S. premiere of “Notebook,” adapted from Ann Dunnigan’s “Seagull” translation about a year before Williams died. The 14-year delay is due to the machinations of Williams’ notoriously controlling executor, Maria St. Just. Hollis snagged the rights to the unpublished work after […]

  • Kesha

    Kesha Releases Song 'Here Comes the Change' for Ruth Bader Ginsburg Movie

    Stephen Hollis’ elegant and generally well-acted Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park production is the U.S. premiere of “Notebook,” adapted from Ann Dunnigan’s “Seagull” translation about a year before Williams died. The 14-year delay is due to the machinations of Williams’ notoriously controlling executor, Maria St. Just. Hollis snagged the rights to the unpublished work after […]

  • The Last Suit

    Film Review: 'The Last Suit'

    Stephen Hollis’ elegant and generally well-acted Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park production is the U.S. premiere of “Notebook,” adapted from Ann Dunnigan’s “Seagull” translation about a year before Williams died. The 14-year delay is due to the machinations of Williams’ notoriously controlling executor, Maria St. Just. Hollis snagged the rights to the unpublished work after […]

  • Mirai, an animated film by Mamoru

    Animation Is Film Festival Announces Opening Night Movie, Competition Titles, Jury

    Stephen Hollis’ elegant and generally well-acted Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park production is the U.S. premiere of “Notebook,” adapted from Ann Dunnigan’s “Seagull” translation about a year before Williams died. The 14-year delay is due to the machinations of Williams’ notoriously controlling executor, Maria St. Just. Hollis snagged the rights to the unpublished work after […]

  • Ryan Reynolds Stunt

    Ryan Reynolds Previews Explosive Stunt in Michael Bay Movie (Watch)

    Stephen Hollis’ elegant and generally well-acted Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park production is the U.S. premiere of “Notebook,” adapted from Ann Dunnigan’s “Seagull” translation about a year before Williams died. The 14-year delay is due to the machinations of Williams’ notoriously controlling executor, Maria St. Just. Hollis snagged the rights to the unpublished work after […]

  • 'Smallfoot' Review: What If Bigfoot Was

    Film Review: 'Smallfoot'

    Stephen Hollis’ elegant and generally well-acted Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park production is the U.S. premiere of “Notebook,” adapted from Ann Dunnigan’s “Seagull” translation about a year before Williams died. The 14-year delay is due to the machinations of Williams’ notoriously controlling executor, Maria St. Just. Hollis snagged the rights to the unpublished work after […]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content