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She Cried No

She Cried No (Monday (23), 9-11 p.m., NBC) Filmed in Los Angeles by Steve White Entertainment for NBC Entertainment. Executive producer, Steve White; co-executive producer, Rosalyn Weinman; producer, Megan Callaway; director, Bethany Rooney; writer, Kathleen Rowell; camera, Isidore Mankofsky; editor, Janet Bartels-Vandagriff; production designer, Jerry Fleming; sound, Sunny Meyer; music, Lee Holdridge; casting, Robert J. Ulrich, Eric Dawson, Carol Kritzer. Cast: Candace Cameron Bure, Mark-Paul Gosselaar, Jenna von Oy, Brandon Douglas, Nikki Cox, Ray Baker, Hillary Danner, Kristoffer Ryan Winters, Jennifer Greenhut, Scott Gurney, David Purdham, Lawrence Pressman, Bess Armstrong, Julie St. Claire, Nick Paonessa, Conni Marie Brazelton, Cynthia Steele, Ria Pavia, Don Dowe, Anne Betancourt, Kevin Richardson, Anthony R. Auer, Patricia Matthew, Deondray Gossett, Kris Iyer, Rainbow Bordeon, Matthew Stephen, Pete Leinbach. Always pertinent subject of acquaintance rape gets the TV movie treatment in "She Cried No." While commendably avoiding hysteria, Kathleen Rowell's script sometimes edges into tedium, and the climactic scene is pretty unbelievable. Best audience should be high-schoolers and their parents. Melissa Connell (Candace Cameron Bure), a freshman at USC-ish Pierpont College (an amalgam of the L.A.-area Claremont and Occidental campuses), attends a party at Kappa Pi fraternity. Before she knows it, she's had too much to drink; while everybody else is dancing the Macarena, she finds herself in the room of BMOC and advanced calculus classmate Scott Baker (Mark-Paul Gosselaar), with him tearing at her clothes. She charges him with rape, he says it was her idea, and her friends and acquaintances are divided on the matter: was it her fault? If so, should she press charges? and so on. Object is to establish guilt, and effect justice. This seems an unlikely prospect, unless there was an unimpeachable witness say, someone filming at the party, who comes up with something resembling a well-financed documentary with strong photography, excellent sound and an amazing talent for being in the right place at the right time without even realizing it. All of that nonsense shows up in the last few minutes; bulk of film is spent on debating rights and responsibilities and watching the frat boys whoop it up on a diet of beer and Jell-O shooters. Actors pull what weight is required of them under Bethany Rooney's direction, with Jenna von Oy sneaking in a subtle performance that does more toward marking her as someone to watch and watch for than her role in "Blossom" ever did. Todd Everett

She Cried No (Monday (23), 9-11 p.m., NBC) Filmed in Los Angeles by Steve White Entertainment for NBC Entertainment. Executive producer, Steve White; co-executive producer, Rosalyn Weinman; producer, Megan Callaway; director, Bethany Rooney; writer, Kathleen Rowell; camera, Isidore Mankofsky; editor, Janet Bartels-Vandagriff; production designer, Jerry Fleming; sound, Sunny Meyer; music, Lee Holdridge; casting, Robert J. Ulrich, Eric Dawson, Carol Kritzer. Cast: Candace Cameron Bure, Mark-Paul Gosselaar, Jenna von Oy, Brandon Douglas, Nikki Cox, Ray Baker, Hillary Danner, Kristoffer Ryan Winters, Jennifer Greenhut, Scott Gurney, David Purdham, Lawrence Pressman, Bess Armstrong, Julie St. Claire, Nick Paonessa, Conni Marie Brazelton, Cynthia Steele, Ria Pavia, Don Dowe, Anne Betancourt, Kevin Richardson, Anthony R. Auer, Patricia Matthew, Deondray Gossett, Kris Iyer, Rainbow Bordeon, Matthew Stephen, Pete Leinbach. Always pertinent subject of acquaintance rape gets the TV movie treatment in “She Cried No.” While commendably avoiding hysteria, Kathleen Rowell’s script sometimes edges into tedium, and the climactic scene is pretty unbelievable. Best audience should be high-schoolers and their parents. Melissa Connell (Candace Cameron Bure), a freshman at USC-ish Pierpont College (an amalgam of the L.A.-area Claremont and Occidental campuses), attends a party at Kappa Pi fraternity. Before she knows it, she’s had too much to drink; while everybody else is dancing the Macarena, she finds herself in the room of BMOC and advanced calculus classmate Scott Baker (Mark-Paul Gosselaar), with him tearing at her clothes. She charges him with rape, he says it was her idea, and her friends and acquaintances are divided on the matter: was it her fault? If so, should she press charges? and so on. Object is to establish guilt, and effect justice. This seems an unlikely prospect, unless there was an unimpeachable witness say, someone filming at the party, who comes up with something resembling a well-financed documentary with strong photography, excellent sound and an amazing talent for being in the right place at the right time without even realizing it. All of that nonsense shows up in the last few minutes; bulk of film is spent on debating rights and responsibilities and watching the frat boys whoop it up on a diet of beer and Jell-O shooters. Actors pull what weight is required of them under Bethany Rooney’s direction, with Jenna von Oy sneaking in a subtle performance that does more toward marking her as someone to watch and watch for than her role in “Blossom” ever did. Todd Everett

She Cried No

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