×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

Mr. Stitch

Title character (Wil Wheaton) who prefers to call himself "Lazarus," was created by team of scientists headed by Dr. Rue Wakeman (Rutger Hauer), using parts of more than 80 men and women of various ethnicities who have donated their bodies to science. Fortunately, in light of pic's two-hour timeslot, Lazarus comes pre-programmed to speak English and behave like a more-or-less human being -- though he's super-strong and looks like a patchwork quilt of various skin colors. Tom Savini's makeup work here is a terrific effect; like nothing you've seen before.

With:
Cast: Wil Wheaton, Rutger Hauer, Nia Peeples, Ron Perlman, Taylor Negron, Al Sapienza, Luke Stratte McClure, Michael Harris, Valerie Trapp, Ron Jeremy Hyatt, Steve Polyi, Rowland Wafford, Ron Hyatt, Derek White, Philip Wotton, Tom Savini, Kario Salem, Sloane Klevin, Salvatore Xuereb, Kevin White, Richard Louderback, Patrick Delalay, Derek White, Laetitia Gagnieux. Frankenstein story gets one more go-round in fable by Roger Avary, making its TV debut following direct-to-video release. Avary, who wrote and directed "Killing Zoe" and shared a writing Oscar with Quentin Tarantino for "Pulp Fiction," gives the story an original touch, but if anybody's triumphant here, it's the highly stylized production design, art direction and makeup.

Title character (Wil Wheaton) who prefers to call himself “Lazarus,” was created by team of scientists headed by Dr. Rue Wakeman (Rutger Hauer), using parts of more than 80 men and women of various ethnicities who have donated their bodies to science. Fortunately, in light of pic’s two-hour timeslot, Lazarus comes pre-programmed to speak English and behave like a more-or-less human being — though he’s super-strong and looks like a patchwork quilt of various skin colors. Tom Savini’s makeup work here is a terrific effect; like nothing you’ve seen before.

TX: TX:Filmed in Nice, France, by Studio Megabloom in association with Rysher Entertainment. Executive producers, Roger Avary, Rutger Hauer, Morgan Mason; producer, Mason; director, script, Avary; Where Hauer is involved, you know that something sinister is going on — even , as in this case, when he’s co-exec producer. Sure enough, all is not what it seems, and it’s up to the surprisingly resourceful Lazarus, aided by psychiatrist Elizabeth (Nia Peeples), to sort things out.

Cast of “Mr. Stitch” includes Ron Perlman, Taylor Negron and Savini as scientists involved in the project. Some of the acting is ghastly, but topliners hold their own, and Wheaton especially should keep a couple of scenes from this on his reel; his is a sensitive and intelligent portrayal.

Much of the film is set in Wakeman’s lab, where everything is stark white, with infrequent dashes of color. Rest of pic’s look is as stylized, under the supervision of production designer Damian La Franche and art directors Kevin White and Richard Louderback (who also appears onscreen, as a soldier). Stark and interesting to look at, it’s far from realistic — Avary claims to be a fan of Fritz Lang, and it shows.

Filming in south of France might have cut costs and provided cast and crew with a lovely vacation, but it results in purported U.S. Army troops dashing about in peculiar-looking cars and a near-climactic chase scene with Remy Julienne’s stunt drivers chasing Lazarus’ car with what appear to be go-carts.

Mr. Stitch

Production: Mr. Stitch (Sat. (17), 8-10 p.m., Sci-Fi Channel)

Crew: Camera, Tom Richmond; editor, Sloane Klevin; production design, Damian La Franche; conceptual art director, Kevin White, Richard Louderback; music, tomandandy; sound, Daniel Brisseau; casting, Rick Montgomery.

With: Cast: Wil Wheaton, Rutger Hauer, Nia Peeples, Ron Perlman, Taylor Negron, Al Sapienza, Luke Stratte McClure, Michael Harris, Valerie Trapp, Ron Jeremy Hyatt, Steve Polyi, Rowland Wafford, Ron Hyatt, Derek White, Philip Wotton, Tom Savini, Kario Salem, Sloane Klevin, Salvatore Xuereb, Kevin White, Richard Louderback, Patrick Delalay, Derek White, Laetitia Gagnieux. Frankenstein story gets one more go-round in fable by Roger Avary, making its TV debut following direct-to-video release. Avary, who wrote and directed "Killing Zoe" and shared a writing Oscar with Quentin Tarantino for "Pulp Fiction," gives the story an original touch, but if anybody's triumphant here, it's the highly stylized production design, art direction and makeup.

More Film

  • Chris Hemsworth Hulk Hogan

    Chris Hemsworth to Play Hulk Hogan in Biopic for Netflix

    Netflix is in the early stages of developing a Hulk Hogan biopic with Chris Hemsworth attached to star as the wrestling legend and produce. Netflix has obtained the exclusive life rights and consulting services from Terry Gene Bollea AKA Hulk Hogan. Todd Phillips, whose credits include “War Dogs” and “The Hangover” trilogy, is attached to [...]

  • Rooftop Films Announces Filmmakers Fund Grant

    Rooftop Films Announces Filmmakers Fund Grant Winners

    Swedish documentary filmmaker Anastasia Kirillova and “Negative Space” co-directors Ru Kuwahata and Max Porter are among the filmmakers who will receive grants from Rooftop Films to help complete their upcoming projects. Kirilova will be awarded $20,000 to finish her film, “In the Shadows of Love,” while collaborators Kuwahata and Porter will receive $10,000 for “Dandelion [...]

  • Jim Gianopulos

    Paramount Chief Jim Gianopulos Unveils Diversity Initiative

    Paramount Pictures chairman and CEO Jim Gianopulos has announced that all studio productions will be required to complete a plan to enhance diversity. Wednesday’s reveal follows Paramount’s commitment to participating in Time’s Up and Annenberg Inclusion Initiative’s 4% Challenge. The name is derived from women having directed only 4% of the country’s top grossing movies [...]

  • Leave No Trace

    Oscar Analysts Are Sincere -- but Often Totally Wrong

    With Oscars arriving Feb. 24, we can expect multiple “who will win/who should win” columns. There will also be a flurry of post-show analyses about the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences and why members voted the way they did. Since AMPAS never releases polls or voting tallies, these pundits will never be contradicted [...]

  • Green Book spiderman into the spider

    On Eve of Oscars, Variety’s Film Experts Answer Three Pressing Questions

    We continue to live in a divided world, with the current political landscape in the United States a seemingly endless hotbed of tumult and acrimony. Issues of racism, bigotry, diversity and gender equality drive the creative players as well, with Oscar-nominated films parlaying said themes into compelling, thought-provoking cinema. To analyze 2018 in big-screen entertainment, [...]

  • Karl Lagerfeld'Lagerfeld Confidential' Photocall at the

    Karl Lagerfeld Remembered at Costume Designers Guild Awards

    The death of fashion and costume designer Karl Lagerfeld cast somewhat of a shadow over the usually jubilant Costume Designers Guild Awards — the only award show where clothes literally steal the spotlight away from actors — which was held at the Beverly Hilton on Tuesday night. Here it was obvious that Lagerfeld’s impact on [...]

  • 'Captain Marvel' First Reactions: Early Reviews

    'Captain Marvel' First Reactions: 'The MCU Feels More Complete'

    “Captain Marvel” is soaring following advanced press screenings on Tuesday. Reactions from early showings have hit Twitter, and audiences are keen on Marvel’s first female-led standalone movie. Critics are praising Brie Larson’s performance as Carol Danvers, the nostalgic ’90s setting, and the cosmic sci-fi elements. Goose, Danvers’ cat, is also getting a lot of attention from [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content