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Mr. Stitch

Title character (Wil Wheaton) who prefers to call himself "Lazarus," was created by team of scientists headed by Dr. Rue Wakeman (Rutger Hauer), using parts of more than 80 men and women of various ethnicities who have donated their bodies to science. Fortunately, in light of pic's two-hour timeslot, Lazarus comes pre-programmed to speak English and behave like a more-or-less human being -- though he's super-strong and looks like a patchwork quilt of various skin colors. Tom Savini's makeup work here is a terrific effect; like nothing you've seen before.

With:
Cast: Wil Wheaton, Rutger Hauer, Nia Peeples, Ron Perlman, Taylor Negron, Al Sapienza, Luke Stratte McClure, Michael Harris, Valerie Trapp, Ron Jeremy Hyatt, Steve Polyi, Rowland Wafford, Ron Hyatt, Derek White, Philip Wotton, Tom Savini, Kario Salem, Sloane Klevin, Salvatore Xuereb, Kevin White, Richard Louderback, Patrick Delalay, Derek White, Laetitia Gagnieux. Frankenstein story gets one more go-round in fable by Roger Avary, making its TV debut following direct-to-video release. Avary, who wrote and directed "Killing Zoe" and shared a writing Oscar with Quentin Tarantino for "Pulp Fiction," gives the story an original touch, but if anybody's triumphant here, it's the highly stylized production design, art direction and makeup.

Title character (Wil Wheaton) who prefers to call himself “Lazarus,” was created by team of scientists headed by Dr. Rue Wakeman (Rutger Hauer), using parts of more than 80 men and women of various ethnicities who have donated their bodies to science. Fortunately, in light of pic’s two-hour timeslot, Lazarus comes pre-programmed to speak English and behave like a more-or-less human being — though he’s super-strong and looks like a patchwork quilt of various skin colors. Tom Savini’s makeup work here is a terrific effect; like nothing you’ve seen before.

TX: TX:Filmed in Nice, France, by Studio Megabloom in association with Rysher Entertainment. Executive producers, Roger Avary, Rutger Hauer, Morgan Mason; producer, Mason; director, script, Avary; Where Hauer is involved, you know that something sinister is going on — even , as in this case, when he’s co-exec producer. Sure enough, all is not what it seems, and it’s up to the surprisingly resourceful Lazarus, aided by psychiatrist Elizabeth (Nia Peeples), to sort things out.

Cast of “Mr. Stitch” includes Ron Perlman, Taylor Negron and Savini as scientists involved in the project. Some of the acting is ghastly, but topliners hold their own, and Wheaton especially should keep a couple of scenes from this on his reel; his is a sensitive and intelligent portrayal.

Much of the film is set in Wakeman’s lab, where everything is stark white, with infrequent dashes of color. Rest of pic’s look is as stylized, under the supervision of production designer Damian La Franche and art directors Kevin White and Richard Louderback (who also appears onscreen, as a soldier). Stark and interesting to look at, it’s far from realistic — Avary claims to be a fan of Fritz Lang, and it shows.

Filming in south of France might have cut costs and provided cast and crew with a lovely vacation, but it results in purported U.S. Army troops dashing about in peculiar-looking cars and a near-climactic chase scene with Remy Julienne’s stunt drivers chasing Lazarus’ car with what appear to be go-carts.

Mr. Stitch

Production: Mr. Stitch (Sat. (17), 8-10 p.m., Sci-Fi Channel)

Crew: Camera, Tom Richmond; editor, Sloane Klevin; production design, Damian La Franche; conceptual art director, Kevin White, Richard Louderback; music, tomandandy; sound, Daniel Brisseau; casting, Rick Montgomery.

With: Cast: Wil Wheaton, Rutger Hauer, Nia Peeples, Ron Perlman, Taylor Negron, Al Sapienza, Luke Stratte McClure, Michael Harris, Valerie Trapp, Ron Jeremy Hyatt, Steve Polyi, Rowland Wafford, Ron Hyatt, Derek White, Philip Wotton, Tom Savini, Kario Salem, Sloane Klevin, Salvatore Xuereb, Kevin White, Richard Louderback, Patrick Delalay, Derek White, Laetitia Gagnieux. Frankenstein story gets one more go-round in fable by Roger Avary, making its TV debut following direct-to-video release. Avary, who wrote and directed "Killing Zoe" and shared a writing Oscar with Quentin Tarantino for "Pulp Fiction," gives the story an original touch, but if anybody's triumphant here, it's the highly stylized production design, art direction and makeup.

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