Ilona Comes with the Rain

Curious, painstakingly made and completely uninvolving, "Ilona Comes With the Rain" should serve as a warning to anyone trying to bring the literature of magic realism to the screen. Putting aside his films based on local history and politics ("Eagles Don't Chase Flies," "The Snail's Strategy"), Colombian helmer Sergio Cabrera turns to a picaresque tale of three imaginary adventurers, based on a story by Latin American writer Alvaro Mutis. Result is alarmingly lightweight and inconsequential, though audiences well plunge into the film as exotic entertainment and enjoy it as a ripping (if overlong) tale. It should work well on TV.

Curious, painstakingly made and completely uninvolving, “Ilona Comes With the Rain” should serve as a warning to anyone trying to bring the literature of magic realism to the screen. Putting aside his films based on local history and politics (“Eagles Don’t Chase Flies,” “The Snail’s Strategy”), Colombian helmer Sergio Cabrera turns to a picaresque tale of three imaginary adventurers, based on a story by Latin American writer Alvaro Mutis. Result is alarmingly lightweight and inconsequential, though audiences well plunge into the film as exotic entertainment and enjoy it as a ripping (if overlong) tale. It should work well on TV.

Mutis, now 73, had a good deal of contact with Hollywood when he headed the Latin American TV divisions of Fox and Columbia before writing seven novels and numerous poems featuring the character Maqroll the sailor. “Ilona Comes With the Rain” is the end of a story cycle recounting the close friendship linking Maqroll with the Lebanese ship owner Abdul and the beautiful Macedonian-Polish adventurer Ilona.

Film unspools in the 1950s in Panama, where Maqroll (the dignified, gray-bearded Humberto Dorado) has been stuck since his ship was confiscated by the authorities. His luck continues to decline until he stumbles across Ilona (an effervescent Margarita Rosa De Francisco), flush with money after selling her cabaret in South Africa. Somehow they manage to contact the third member of their trio, Abdul (dashing Imanol Arias), who has been thrown into prison for arms smuggling.

Living barely this side of the law, sleeping either in jail or in luxury hotels, these three improbable characters float through the film like well-read refugees from the Foreign Legion. They speak all languages, know every port and have no roots, past or families to worry about.

Not content with getting Abdul released from prison, Ilona and Maqroll decide to help him realize his dream of buying a tramp steamer. To make money in a hurry, they set up a lavish bordello where the girls dress up as 1950s airline hostesses and the bedrooms are outfitted like the inside of a plane. It’s a nice gag, but extended far beyond its worth.

As admirably transgressive as the trio is, bound inseparably by fierce loyalty and so forth, none has the depth of character to make what they do matter in the slightest. The sparkling De Francisco, a TV performer making her screen debut, exudes personality and magnetism, but her Ilona is a pretty shell, a coquettish businesswoman without a soul. Dorado and Arias come off equally flat, as though peeled off the pages of Mutis’ book without being plumped up again.

Equally problematic is Larissa (Pastor Vega), former companion to a Sicilian princess who ends up practicing the oldest profession in Ilona and Maqroll’s brothel. Vega strives valiantly to bring out Larissa’s darkness and neurosis, but fails to show why she has such a sinister influence over Ilona. Like much else in the film, the audience is told what to feel, but not made to feel it.

Excellent cinematography by Gianni Mammolotti creates a sensuous make-believe Panama flashing with neon lights. A quartet of art directors earns kudos for the amusing sets, particularly the jet-age brothel. Luis Bacalov (“Il Postino”) drapes the score with lyrical, romantic mood pieces. Producer Sandro Silvestri maintains a tone of high production values throughout the pic, which was lensed in Cuba, Panama, Colombia and Italy.

Ilona Comes with the Rain

(ILONA LLEGA CON LA LLUVIA)

Production: (ITALIAN-SPANISH) A Medusa release (in Italy). Produced by Sandro Silvestri for Emme (Italy)/Fotoemme (Spain), in association with Caracol Television/Bavaria/Producciones Fotograma (Colombia). (International sales: Sacis.) Directed by Sergio Cabrera. Screenplay, Jorge Goldenberg, with Ana Goldenberg , Cabrera, based on a novel by Alvaro Mutis.

Crew: Camera (color), Gianni Mammolotti; editor, Nicholas WentWorth; music, Luis Bacalov; art direction, Felipe Dothee, Enrique Linero, Luis Alfonso Triana, Massimo Spano; costumes, Alessandra Montagna, Martha Torres; sound (Dolby stereo), Umberto Montesanti. Reviewed at Venice Film Festival (competing), Sept. 2, 1996. Running time: 135 MIN.

With: With: Margarita Rosa De Francisco, Humberto Dorado, Imanol Arias, Pastora Vega, Davide Rondino, Jose Luis Borau, Antonino Iuorio.

More Film

  • 'The Equalizer 2' Review

    Film Review: Denzel Washington in 'The Equalizer 2'

    Curious, painstakingly made and completely uninvolving, “Ilona Comes With the Rain” should serve as a warning to anyone trying to bring the literature of magic realism to the screen. Putting aside his films based on local history and politics (“Eagles Don’t Chase Flies,” “The Snail’s Strategy”), Colombian helmer Sergio Cabrera turns to a picaresque tale […]

  • Stan Dragoti 'The Last Boyscout' PremiereDecember

    Stan Dragoti, Director of 'Mr. Mom,' 'Love at First Bite,' Dies at 85

    Curious, painstakingly made and completely uninvolving, “Ilona Comes With the Rain” should serve as a warning to anyone trying to bring the literature of magic realism to the screen. Putting aside his films based on local history and politics (“Eagles Don’t Chase Flies,” “The Snail’s Strategy”), Colombian helmer Sergio Cabrera turns to a picaresque tale […]

  • Jagged Edge

    Film News Roundup: Halle Berry's 'Jagged Edge' Remake Finds Writer

    Curious, painstakingly made and completely uninvolving, “Ilona Comes With the Rain” should serve as a warning to anyone trying to bring the literature of magic realism to the screen. Putting aside his films based on local history and politics (“Eagles Don’t Chase Flies,” “The Snail’s Strategy”), Colombian helmer Sergio Cabrera turns to a picaresque tale […]

  • Kate Winslet Diane Keaton Mia Wasikowska

    Kate Winslet, Diane Keaton, Mia Wasikowska to Star in 'Silent Heart' Remake

    Curious, painstakingly made and completely uninvolving, “Ilona Comes With the Rain” should serve as a warning to anyone trying to bring the literature of magic realism to the screen. Putting aside his films based on local history and politics (“Eagles Don’t Chase Flies,” “The Snail’s Strategy”), Colombian helmer Sergio Cabrera turns to a picaresque tale […]

  • (L to R) Young Tanya (JESSICA

    'Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again' Reviews: What the Critics Are Saying

    Curious, painstakingly made and completely uninvolving, “Ilona Comes With the Rain” should serve as a warning to anyone trying to bring the literature of magic realism to the screen. Putting aside his films based on local history and politics (“Eagles Don’t Chase Flies,” “The Snail’s Strategy”), Colombian helmer Sergio Cabrera turns to a picaresque tale […]

  • Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants

    'Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants' Stage Musical in the Works

    Curious, painstakingly made and completely uninvolving, “Ilona Comes With the Rain” should serve as a warning to anyone trying to bring the literature of magic realism to the screen. Putting aside his films based on local history and politics (“Eagles Don’t Chase Flies,” “The Snail’s Strategy”), Colombian helmer Sergio Cabrera turns to a picaresque tale […]

  • Sundance Film Festival Placeholder

    Sundance Festival's Economic Impact Jumps Up 26% From 2017, Study Says

    Curious, painstakingly made and completely uninvolving, “Ilona Comes With the Rain” should serve as a warning to anyone trying to bring the literature of magic realism to the screen. Putting aside his films based on local history and politics (“Eagles Don’t Chase Flies,” “The Snail’s Strategy”), Colombian helmer Sergio Cabrera turns to a picaresque tale […]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content