×

Doyle Bramhall II

Doyle Bramhall II (Viper Room; 300 capacity; $ 10) Presented inhouse. Band: Bramhall, Wendy Melvoin, Lisa Coleman, Abe Laboriel Jr., Bill Cassis, Susannah Melvoin. Reviewed Oct. 9, 1996. Highly touted when he led Geffen act Arc Angels with Texas poster boy Charlie Sexton, Doyle Bramhall II returns in a much-more polished place with pleasantly crafted material that bears the creative stamp of producers and former Prince proteges Wendy and Lisa. But where that duo carries credible weight (R&B markets) isn't where this disc is headed, which could pose some marketing dilemmas regardless of the engaging nature of this music. While Bramhall hasn't grafted himself onto a load of Prince riffs, bandmates Wendy Melvoin and Lisa Coleman clearly play a major role in bringing a smooth midtempo influence and cohesiveness to the project. The Arc Angels, which featured Stevie Ray Vaughan's rhythm section, was a sloppy unit that gelled only on Texas blues shuffles; this band not only doesn't go there, it favors the lighter blues-rock of Derek and the Dominoes and Prince's psychedelic pop phase (think 1985's "Around the World in a Day"). Bramhall, dressed in a black boa-accented shirt that suggested yet another nod to the Artist Formerly Known As , presents songs from his Geffen solo debut most of which examine a man's relationship with himself or a lover in a sweetly hued mumble, often twinned with the more emotion-free vocals of Wendy and Susannah Melvoin. It adds to the load of charisma he projects from the stage, which could be a major selling point if he winds up opening shows for a more-established act. Phil Gallo

Doyle Bramhall II (Viper Room; 300 capacity; $ 10) Presented inhouse. Band: Bramhall, Wendy Melvoin, Lisa Coleman, Abe Laboriel Jr., Bill Cassis, Susannah Melvoin. Reviewed Oct. 9, 1996. Highly touted when he led Geffen act Arc Angels with Texas poster boy Charlie Sexton, Doyle Bramhall II returns in a much-more polished place with pleasantly crafted material that bears the creative stamp of producers and former Prince proteges Wendy and Lisa. But where that duo carries credible weight (R&B markets) isn’t where this disc is headed, which could pose some marketing dilemmas regardless of the engaging nature of this music. While Bramhall hasn’t grafted himself onto a load of Prince riffs, bandmates Wendy Melvoin and Lisa Coleman clearly play a major role in bringing a smooth midtempo influence and cohesiveness to the project. The Arc Angels, which featured Stevie Ray Vaughan’s rhythm section, was a sloppy unit that gelled only on Texas blues shuffles; this band not only doesn’t go there, it favors the lighter blues-rock of Derek and the Dominoes and Prince’s psychedelic pop phase (think 1985’s “Around the World in a Day”). Bramhall, dressed in a black boa-accented shirt that suggested yet another nod to the Artist Formerly Known As , presents songs from his Geffen solo debut most of which examine a man’s relationship with himself or a lover in a sweetly hued mumble, often twinned with the more emotion-free vocals of Wendy and Susannah Melvoin. It adds to the load of charisma he projects from the stage, which could be a major selling point if he winds up opening shows for a more-established act. Phil Gallo

Doyle Bramhall II

  • Production:
  • Crew:
  • With:
  • Music By: