Bless This House

The wisecracks, the inferences and the style throughout the sitcom lean to the crude — but crude, of course, tends to be in fashion.

The wisecracks, the inferences and the style throughout the sitcom lean to the crude — but crude, of course, tends to be in fashion.

Director Barnet Kellman bounces laugh lines along at a brisk clip, and if remarks aren’t laughable, they’re lobbed over in a way to make them sound racy. Creator Bruce Helford’s writing is often ham-handed, and there’s no discernible taste line to worry about crossing. Lots of it is real burleycue humor: vulgar, raw, brash humor that kept grind houses open for years. How much is welcome in living rooms is another subject. Clay’s acting is awkward and forced, but Moriarty’s a treasure, no matter what she has to say. Guest star Patricia Healy comes on like a bombshell despite an inane exchange between her character and Burt in the post office (Helford hands Burt a couple of not-so-funny remarks about postal shootings). Neighbors Phyllis and Lenny (Molly Price, Don Stark) look potentially rich for character mining, but Mimi Kennedy is wasted as a real estate agent. Show will air Wednesdays at 8 p.m. beginning Wednesday. Though “Bless” looks to be trying to carbon “The Honeymooners,” its closest relative would seem to be “Married With … Children.” The Kramdens and the Nortons wouldn’t know from raunch.