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Lee Chia

Lee Chia, a key figure in early Taiwanese cinema of the ’50s and ’60s, died in mid-January in Taipei. He was 71.

Born in Fujian province, China, where he started as a reporter and editor, Lee moved to Taiwan in 1947 and from 1951 scripted agricultural documentaries.

In 1954, he became a script editor for the government-owned Central Motion Picture Corp. He later became a director.

The best-known of his two dozen Mandarin-dialect movies include “Oyster Girl” (1964, co-director), “Orchids and My Love” (1965), “Fire Bulls” (1966, co-director), and “Tiao Chan” (The Bait of Beauty) (1967, co-director). His last film was in 1981.

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