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Five Blind Boys of Alabama

Presented inhouse. Band: Clarence Fountain, George Scott, Jimmy Carter, Sam Butler, Joey Williams, Bobby Butler, Eric McKinnie. Reviewed Aug. 17, 1995. The Five Blind Boys of Alabama were frequent visitors to the House of Blues stage even before they were signed to the nightclub chain's fledgling record label. Managed by the club's booker, Kevin Morrow, and with their new album ("I Brought Him With Me") on the verge of release, they're likely to become an even more frequent attraction. Though it's a bit unnerving at first to see them in such a relatively heathenestablishment, the Blind Boys give a show as robust and physical as any pop band the club may book. Most of the singing was shared by George Scott, Jimmy Carter and nominal leader Clarence Fountain, with Carter the hardest-working of all -- spinning around, venturing out into the audience and wailing all the while. Carter has developed a variation on James Brown's old cape gag: As his bodyguard attempts to bring Carter back on stage from the House of Blues' mosh pit, Carter thrusts his arms out, disengages from the guard and walks through the crowd one more time.

Presented inhouse. Band: Clarence Fountain, George Scott, Jimmy Carter, Sam Butler, Joey Williams, Bobby Butler, Eric McKinnie. Reviewed Aug. 17, 1995. The Five Blind Boys of Alabama were frequent visitors to the House of Blues stage even before they were signed to the nightclub chain’s fledgling record label. Managed by the club’s booker, Kevin Morrow, and with their new album (“I Brought Him With Me”) on the verge of release, they’re likely to become an even more frequent attraction. Though it’s a bit unnerving at first to see them in such a relatively heathenestablishment, the Blind Boys give a show as robust and physical as any pop band the club may book. Most of the singing was shared by George Scott, Jimmy Carter and nominal leader Clarence Fountain, with Carter the hardest-working of all — spinning around, venturing out into the audience and wailing all the while. Carter has developed a variation on James Brown’s old cape gag: As his bodyguard attempts to bring Carter back on stage from the House of Blues’ mosh pit, Carter thrusts his arms out, disengages from the guard and walks through the crowd one more time.

The group’s band is a notable asset, with guitarists Sam Butler and Joey Williams supplying tasteful backing that far better-known players would envy, and bassist Bobby Butler and drummer Eric McKinnie a solid, unpretentious rhythm section.

Five Blind Boys of Alabama

(House of Blues; 500 capacity; $ 17.50)

  • Production: A gospel group that has been recording, with essentially the same personnel, since 1948, the Blind Boys are now following the lead of such formerly pure gospel groups as the Staple Singers and the Oak Ridge Boys by allowing some secular material to slip into their act. An exciting, protracted rendition of the old folkie favorite "If I Had a Hammer" was a highlight of Thursday night's
  • Crew: Set, morphing into something notably similar to the Isley Brothers' "Shout."
  • Cast:
  • Music By: