MacDonald Carey

Macdonald Carey, the fatherly Dr. Horton on “Days of Our Lives” and voice of the soap opera’s trademark opening, “Like sands through the hourglass …,” died of cancer March 21. He was 81.

Although he appeared on Broadway and in more than 50 films, Carey made his mark in “Days of Our Lives,” winning Emmys in 1974 and 1975 as best television actor in a daytime drama. He had been with the show since its 1965 debut.

“I’ve known Mac for 17, 18 years. He was as gentle and nurturing and charming a man as you would ever want to meet,” said actress Deidre Hall, who plays psychiatrist Marlena Evans Brady on the show.

Before his soap opera career, Carey was cast as a leading man in Hollywood movies of the 1940s and ’50s, most notably Alfred Hitchcock’s “Shadow of a Doubt” in 1943.

He began in show business as a radio and stage actor in the 1930s and early ‘ 40s, starring in “Lady in the Dark” on Broadway.

His better-known films included “Suddenly It’s Spring” (1947), “Dream Girl” ( 1948) and “The Great Gatsby” (1949).

He also published three volumes of poetry and a 1991 autobiography, “The Days of My Life.”

On television, he starred in the title role of the 1956 series “Dr. Christian” and in the drama “Lock Up” from 1959-61. He played Squire James in 1977’s acclaimed miniseries “Roots” and had many other guest roles in regular series and television movies.

He battled cancer for years, undergoing surgery in 1991 to remove a malignant lung tumor.

Survivors include six children and six grandchildren.

MAI ZETTERLING

Swedish-born actress and director Mai Zetterling died in London March 17 from cancer, her theatrical agent said. She was 68.

Zetterling, whose career spanned acting, directing and writing, made her stage and screen debut at the age of 16 in Stockholm. After appearing in several Swedish films she was invited to Britain in 1946 to star in the film “Frieda.”

A beautiful blonde, she subsequently appeared in many other British films as well as several American productions.

She co-starred with Anjelica Huston in Nicholas Roeg’s 1989 film “The Witches” and appeared in the 1990 film “Hidden Agenda,” directed by Ken Loach. Earlier notable roles were in “Knock on Wood” with Danny Kaye, “Desperate Moment” with Dirk Bogarde and “Only Two Can Play” with Peter Sellers.

In the early 1960s she made her directorial debut with a documentary, “The War Game,” which she co-wrote with her second husband, David Hughes and which won first prize at a Venice film festival in 1963.

Zetterling went on to direct several films in Sweden, with themes often dealing with the role of women in modern society, noted for their intense dramatic sense and explicit sexuality.

She also wrote several novels including “Night Games,” which provided the basis of her second feature film as director in 1966. She directed and co-wrote the English film “Scrubbers.”

Born in Vasteras, Sweden, on May 24, 1925, Zetterling was, according to her agent, married and divorced twice. She is survived by a daughter and a son.

Zetterling had homes in London and Banne, in the Ardeche region of southern France. In the past several years, she divided her time between the two.

WALTER LANTZ

Animator Walter Lantz, who created the conniving Woody Woodpecker cartoon character after a woodpecker disrupted his honeymoon in the 1940s, died March 22 . He was 93.

Lantz was given an honorary Academy Award in 1978 “for bringing joy and laughter to every part of the world through his unique animated motion pictures.”

His cartoon stable also included Andy Panda, Chilly Willy, Smedley, Sugarfoot , Charley Beary and Oswald Rabbit. In 1930, he made animation history by producing the first Technicolor cartoon — the five-minute opening sequence of “The King of Jazz.”

His wife, Gracie, who helped conceive Woody Woodpecker and gave the bird its contemptuous “Heh-heh-heh-HEHHHH-heh” laugh, died in March 1992 at age 88.

Woody was inspired by a woodpecker that disturbed the Lantz honeymoon at California’s Lake June in the early 1940s. Mrs. Lantz suggested her husband create an animated character based on the bird.

The late Mel Blanc was among a flock of actors who became the bird’s voice over the years. But Lantz was forced to hunt for another Woody voice when Blanc signed an exclusive contract to do the voices of Bugs Bunny and other Warner Bros. characters in the late 1940s.

GIULIETTA MASINA

Giulietta Masina, the wife and leading lady of the late movie director Federico Fellini, died March 23 in Rome. She was 74.

Masina was being treated for a tumor at the Columbus Clinic, where she had been admitted in October, the hospital said.

The wide-eyed actress appeared in some of Fellini’s best-known films, including “La Strada,””The Nights of Cabiria” and “Juliet of the Spirits.”

She returned to the screen in 1985 after almost 20 years to star with Marcello Mastroianni in Fellini’s “Ginger and Fred.”

Fellini died last October after a stroke, and a badly shaken Masina was hospitalized with exhaustion.

Her best-known role was as Gelsomina, the haunting waif who became the exploited companion of circus strongman Anthony Quinn in “La Strada,” which won the Oscar as best foreign film.

Masina, born near Bologna, was the daughter of a school teacher, and began acting with a university drama group. She got her first break in 1942, starring on an Italian radio show in a play written by Fellini, who was a fellow student.

They were married the following year and remained inseparable until Fellini’s death on Oct. 31.

She won the Cannes Film Festival best actress award for her role as a prostitute in the “Nights of Cabiria” (1956).

Masina is survived by a sister.

HAROLD MYERS

Harold Myers, Variety’s longtime London-based European chief and preeminent entertainment trade journalist of his time, died March 17 at his home in Brighton, England, of a heart attack. He was 83.

He had suffered an earlier heart attack around Christmas, and had been in failing health for some time.

Born in 1912 in Russia, Myers moved at an early age with his family to the U.K. During World War II he served in the British army.

In 1948, he joined Variety’s London bureau and was responsible for editorial and marketing throughout continental Europe. At his peak, he was in charge of some 50 stringers.

Myers became a militant member of the U.K.’s National Union of Journalists.

Ill health forced him to quit the London bureau in 1968 and he became a traveling rep for the paper in territories such as Japan, the Far East and Australia. He was a familiar figure at all major film festivals.

Myers pioneered the concept of Variety special issues for major markets and festivals, including Cannes, MIP-TV and MIFED.

He instigated the opening of fully staffed foreign offices for Variety, notably Paris and Sydney. During his 20 years in London, he also covered the film, TV and legit beats as a reporter and critic, under the signature Myro.

A confidant of industry leaders, Myers numbered many top execs and impresarios among his friends, including Lew Grade, Bernard Delfont, Peter Saunders, Michael Balcon and Sydney Bernstein.

He is survived by his wife.

BILL HARP

Bill Harp, four-time award-winning set decorator, died of a heart attack March 16 in Hollywood. He was 70.

His career, spanning 36 years in New York and Hollywood, included the decoration of such shows as “Omnibus,””The Garry Moore Show,””The Perry Como Show,””The Carol Burnett Show,””Moonlighting” and “L.A. Law.”

He won Emmys for “My Name Is Barbara,””Studios Lonigan” and “Moonlighting.”

Harp worked on many movies of the week and series including “Paper Dolls” and “A Cat on a Hot Tin Roof.”

He was nominated for 24 Emmys.

He was a member of the Set Decorators Union IATSE

44 and the Set Decorators Society of America.

Survivors include his companion, Marshall Alan Philips, a brother, two sisters and seven nieces and nephews.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the American Actors Fund or Project Angel Food, Los Angeles.

LILI DAMITA

Lili Damita, a French-born actress and former wife of Errol Flynn, died March 21 after a lengthy illness in Palm Beach, Fla.

Film reference books list her age as 92, though her death certificate listed her as 85.

Born Liliane Marie Madeleine Carre, she used the name Lili Damita professionally but was known as Liliane Loomis after her 1962 marriage to Allen Loomis, an Iowa dairy products manufacturer. That marriage ended in divorce in the mid-1980s.

From her teen years, she was a ballerina and music hall performer. She appeared in French, German, Austrian and British movies during the 1920s, including “Fiacre No. 13.”

She came to Hollywood in the late ’20s at the invitation of Samuel Goldwyn to appear in early sound pictures.

Her American films included the 1929 version of “The Bridge of San Luis Rey, “”The Cock-Eyed World,””Brewster’s Millions” and “The Devil on Horseback.”

She was to be buried in Fort Dodge, Iowa. No services were planned.

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