Angels in the Outfield

The term "crowd-pleasing" is frequently overused, but it applies to this -- the latest in a line of so-so baseball movies, which serves up its corn so unabashedly it's hard to take offense at its sappiness. Most of its appeal is strictly for tykes, but as the roar of Disney's "The Lion King" gradually fades, this soft pop-up to the family audience could do some purring for the studio as well.

With:
George Knox - Danny Glover
Mel Clark - Tony Danza
Maggie Nelson - Brenda Fricker
Al the Angel - Christopher Lloyd
Hank Murphy - Ben Johnson
Ranch Wilder - Jay O. Sanders
Roger - Joseph Gordon-Levitt
J.P. - Milton Davis Jr.
David Montagne - Taylor Negron

The term “crowd-pleasing” is frequently overused, but it applies to this — the latest in a line of so-so baseball movies, which serves up its corn so unabashedly it’s hard to take offense at its sappiness. Most of its appeal is strictly for tykes, but as the roar of Disney’s “The Lion King” gradually fades, this soft pop-up to the family audience could do some purring for the studio as well.

“Angels in the Outfield” shows scant devotion to the 1951 film on which it’s based, changing the gender of its child lead and augmenting its implied magic with gauzily shot angels and other special effects — clearly aimed at a new generation of moviegoers that isn’t trusted to appreciate subtlety or possess much imagination.

Updated for non-nuclear families of the ’90s, the story centers on a foster child, Roger (Joseph Gordon-Levitt), whose shiftless father says he may be able to reclaim him when the boy’s favorite team, the last-place California Angels, wins the pennant.

Roger offers up a prayer to make it so, and the stars twinkle in response — sending down a wild-eyed, honest-to-you-know-who angel, Al (Christopher Lloyd), whom only Roger can see.

Circumstances bring Roger and his friend J.P. (Milton Davis Jr., the tot made famous by bantering with Shaquille O’Neal in a Pepsi commercial) into contact with the Angels’ sour manager, George Knox (Danny Glover), who ultimately comes to believe the boy and uses his heavenly advice to lift the team out of the cellar.

William Dear, who directed the equally warm and fuzzy “Harry and the Hendersons,” doesn’t shy away from overblown sentimentality after a rather slow and grim first act, as glowing winged figures pop up all over the field. The script by Dorothy Kingsley, George Wells and HollyGoldberg Sloan also provides enough broad sight gags to entertain the moppet set.

In fact, “Angels” is so soft there’s barely a Snidely Whiplash in the piece, other than a smarmy radio announcer (Jay O. Sanders) who’s rooting for Knox to fail.

Glover brings the requisite mix of exasperation and reluctant warmth to his role, while Tony Danza has what amounts to an extended cameo as a washed-up pitcher given a second chance — enjoying the pic’s most moving scene, but one that also demonstrates the depths to which it’ll sink in leaving no heartstring unplucked.

Tech credits are sound, if a little overdone in visualizing the angelic visitors.

Angels in the Outfield

(Fantasy/comedy -- Color)

Production: A Buena Vista release of a Walt Disney Pictures presentation in association with Caravan Pictures. Produced by Irby Smith, Joe Roth, Roger Birnbaum. Executive producer, Gary Stutman. Directed by William Dear. Screenplay, Dorothy Kingsley, George Wells, Holly Goldberg Sloan. Based on the motion picture "Angels in the Outfield" from the Turner Entertainment Co. library.

Crew: Camera (Technicolor color), Matthew F. Leonetti; editor, Bruce Green; music, Randy Edelman; production design, Dennis Washington; art direction, Thomas T. Targownik; set decoration, John Anderson; costume design, Rosanna Norton; sound (Dolby), Willie Burton; associate producer, Sloan; production manager/associate producer, Richard H. Prince; assistant director, L. Dean Jones Jr.; second-unit director, Smith; visual effects supervisor, Giedra Rackauskas; casting, Pam Dixon Mickelson. Reviewed at the Mann Village Theatre, L.A., July 9, 1994. MPAA Rating: PG. Running time: 102 min.

With: George Knox - Danny Glover
Mel Clark - Tony Danza
Maggie Nelson - Brenda Fricker
Al the Angel - Christopher Lloyd
Hank Murphy - Ben Johnson
Ranch Wilder - Jay O. Sanders
Roger - Joseph Gordon-Levitt
J.P. - Milton Davis Jr.
David Montagne - Taylor Negron

More Film

  • 'Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse' Teases Spider-Ham

    'Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse' Teases Spider-Ham, Other Webspinners

    The term “crowd-pleasing” is frequently overused, but it applies to this — the latest in a line of so-so baseball movies, which serves up its corn so unabashedly it’s hard to take offense at its sappiness. Most of its appeal is strictly for tykes, but as the roar of Disney’s “The Lion King” gradually fades, […]

  • Venom Comic-Con

    'Venom' Creators Promise 'Huge World,' Tease Spider-Man Fight

    The term “crowd-pleasing” is frequently overused, but it applies to this — the latest in a line of so-so baseball movies, which serves up its corn so unabashedly it’s hard to take offense at its sappiness. Most of its appeal is strictly for tykes, but as the roar of Disney’s “The Lion King” gradually fades, […]

  • Bully

    Film News Roundup: Danny Trejo's Dark Comedy 'Bully' Scores Distribution

    The term “crowd-pleasing” is frequently overused, but it applies to this — the latest in a line of so-so baseball movies, which serves up its corn so unabashedly it’s hard to take offense at its sappiness. Most of its appeal is strictly for tykes, but as the roar of Disney’s “The Lion King” gradually fades, […]

  • Jamie Lee Curtis Hugs Fan Who

    Jamie Lee Curtis Embraces Sobbing Fan, Who Says 'Halloween' Saved His Life

    The term “crowd-pleasing” is frequently overused, but it applies to this — the latest in a line of so-so baseball movies, which serves up its corn so unabashedly it’s hard to take offense at its sappiness. Most of its appeal is strictly for tykes, but as the roar of Disney’s “The Lion King” gradually fades, […]

  • Teen Titans Go to the Movies

    Film Review: 'Teen Titans GO! to the Movies'

    The term “crowd-pleasing” is frequently overused, but it applies to this — the latest in a line of so-so baseball movies, which serves up its corn so unabashedly it’s hard to take offense at its sappiness. Most of its appeal is strictly for tykes, but as the roar of Disney’s “The Lion King” gradually fades, […]

  • Glass trailer

    M. Night Shyamalan's 'Glass' Trailer Debuts at Comic-Con

    The term “crowd-pleasing” is frequently overused, but it applies to this — the latest in a line of so-so baseball movies, which serves up its corn so unabashedly it’s hard to take offense at its sappiness. Most of its appeal is strictly for tykes, but as the roar of Disney’s “The Lion King” gradually fades, […]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content