The Time of Your Life

William Saroyan's Pulitzer Prize-winning 1930s social fable is treated with such reverence by the Group Repertory Theatre the play never takes on a life of its own. Though the action is anchored by Lonny Chapman's wonderful portrayal of the alcoholic benefactor Joe, director Bert Rosario has imbued the ensemble's interplay with little more vitality than a static play reading: All the lines are heard distinctly, but there is very little characterization behind them.

With:
Joe ... Lonny Chapman Tom ... Skip Parry Nick ... Lou Volpe Kitty Duval ... Liz Porter Dudley ... Van Boudreaux Elsie ... Ronna J. Levy Harriett ...Mary Ann Miller Wesley ... Stephen Hudis Kit Carson ... Larry Eisenberg The Drunkard ... Jeff Davis Blick ... Chris Winfield Krupp ... Larry Kelley McCarthy ... Philip McKeown

William Saroyan’s Pulitzer Prize-winning 1930s social fable is treated with such reverence by the Group Repertory Theatre the play never takes on a life of its own. Though the action is anchored by Lonny Chapman’s wonderful portrayal of the alcoholic benefactor Joe, director Bert Rosario has imbued the ensemble’s interplay with little more vitality than a static play reading: All the lines are heard distinctly, but there is very little characterization behind them.

It is 1939, and Saroyan’s downtrodden denizens of Nick’s San Francisco waterfront honky-tonk are a poignant reflection of America’s struggle to rise above the numbing debilitation of the Depression.

Under the crusty but benevolent eye of Nick (Lou Volpe), myriad lost souls gather to numb their senses and feed their dreams: Kitty (Liz Porter), the whore with the innocence of a child; Harriett (Mary Ann Miller), the talentless comedienne/dancer with dreams ofstardom; Kit Carson (Larry Eisenberg), the mountain man with a million tales; Dudley (Van Boudreaux), the lovesick youth whose whole life is controlled by just one part of his body; and McCarthy (Philip McKeown), a philosophical longshoreman whose intellect has been channeled into fighting for workers’ rights.

The wealthy but enigmatic Joe (Chapman) is a constant presence in the bar, dispensing meandering philosophy to everyone, and cryptic orders to his henchman , the slow-witted but good-hearted Tom (Skip Parry). As Joe saturates himself in champagne, he strives valiantly to bring happiness to anyone who enters the domain of his table at Nick’s.

Director Rosario gives his ensemble few tools to work with, but there are two performances that shine above the limitations of the staging. Eisenberg offers a virtuoso demonstration of the art of the monologue, delivering the searingly original reminiscenses of the semi-mad character. Also memorable is the physical comedy of Jeff Davis as the Drunkard, akin to Red Skelton’s renowned drunk, Freddie the Freeloader.

The bar setting by Malcom Atterbury Jr. and Desma Murphy captures perfectly the atmosphere of the times. But Mason Malone’s inconsistent lighting is more a hindrance than a help.

The Time of Your Life

(Group Repertory Theatre, North Hollywood; 99 seats; $ 10 top)

Production: The Group Repertory Theatre presents a play in two acts by William Saroyan, directed by Bert Rosario. Producer, Kat' L.B.W..

Creative: Set design, Malcolm Atterbury Jr., Desma Murphy; lighting, Mason Malone; sound, William A. McCoy; costumes, Marion Wright. Opened July 16, 1993; reviewed Aug. 1; runs through Aug. 21.

Cast: Joe ... Lonny Chapman Tom ... Skip Parry Nick ... Lou Volpe Kitty Duval ... Liz Porter Dudley ... Van Boudreaux Elsie ... Ronna J. Levy Harriett ...Mary Ann Miller Wesley ... Stephen Hudis Kit Carson ... Larry Eisenberg The Drunkard ... Jeff Davis Blick ... Chris Winfield Krupp ... Larry Kelley McCarthy ... Philip McKeown

More Legit

  • Allelujah! review

    London Theater Review: 'Allelujah!' by Alan Bennett

    William Saroyan’s Pulitzer Prize-winning 1930s social fable is treated with such reverence by the Group Repertory Theatre the play never takes on a life of its own. Though the action is anchored by Lonny Chapman’s wonderful portrayal of the alcoholic benefactor Joe, director Bert Rosario has imbued the ensemble’s interplay with little more vitality than […]

  • A Monster Calls review

    London Theater Review: 'A Monster Calls'

    William Saroyan’s Pulitzer Prize-winning 1930s social fable is treated with such reverence by the Group Repertory Theatre the play never takes on a life of its own. Though the action is anchored by Lonny Chapman’s wonderful portrayal of the alcoholic benefactor Joe, director Bert Rosario has imbued the ensemble’s interplay with little more vitality than […]

  • Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants

    'Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants' Stage Musical in the Works

    William Saroyan’s Pulitzer Prize-winning 1930s social fable is treated with such reverence by the Group Repertory Theatre the play never takes on a life of its own. Though the action is anchored by Lonny Chapman’s wonderful portrayal of the alcoholic benefactor Joe, director Bert Rosario has imbued the ensemble’s interplay with little more vitality than […]

  • Joe Morton

    Joe Morton, Daphne Rubin-Vega Among Rebel Verses Guest Performers (EXCLUSIVE)

    William Saroyan’s Pulitzer Prize-winning 1930s social fable is treated with such reverence by the Group Repertory Theatre the play never takes on a life of its own. Though the action is anchored by Lonny Chapman’s wonderful portrayal of the alcoholic benefactor Joe, director Bert Rosario has imbued the ensemble’s interplay with little more vitality than […]

  • The Lehman Trilogy review

    London Theater Review: 'The Lehman Trilogy,' Directed by Sam Mendes

    William Saroyan’s Pulitzer Prize-winning 1930s social fable is treated with such reverence by the Group Repertory Theatre the play never takes on a life of its own. Though the action is anchored by Lonny Chapman’s wonderful portrayal of the alcoholic benefactor Joe, director Bert Rosario has imbued the ensemble’s interplay with little more vitality than […]

  • elizabeth perkins First Time in Variety

    Elizabeth Perkins on Her Early Film, Stage Roles

    William Saroyan’s Pulitzer Prize-winning 1930s social fable is treated with such reverence by the Group Repertory Theatre the play never takes on a life of its own. Though the action is anchored by Lonny Chapman’s wonderful portrayal of the alcoholic benefactor Joe, director Bert Rosario has imbued the ensemble’s interplay with little more vitality than […]

  • 'Mary Page Marlowe' Review: Tatiana Maslany

    Off Broadway Review: 'Mary Page Marlowe'

    William Saroyan’s Pulitzer Prize-winning 1930s social fable is treated with such reverence by the Group Repertory Theatre the play never takes on a life of its own. Though the action is anchored by Lonny Chapman’s wonderful portrayal of the alcoholic benefactor Joe, director Bert Rosario has imbued the ensemble’s interplay with little more vitality than […]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content