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Sister Act 2: Back in the Habit

Two trips to the convent is one too many. Suffering a bad case of sequelitis, this "Sister Act" follow-up is too formulaic and frequently pauses to sermonize at the expense of entertaining. Although there is clearly a built-in audience eager to clap along, pic lacks the charm and buoyancy that made the first "Act" a mass-appeal hit, and a heavenly opening B.O. glow could fade quickly as the holiday sweepstakes wear on.

With:
Deloris - Whoopi Goldberg
Sister Mary Patrick - Kathy Najimy
Father Maurice - Barnard Hughes
Sister Mary Lazarus - Mary Wickes
Mr. Crisp - James Coburn
Father Ignatius - Michael Jeter
Sister Mary Robert - Wendy Makkena
Florence Watson - Sheryl Lee Ralph
Joey Bustamente - Robert Pastorelli
Father Wolfgang - Thomas Gottschalk
Mother Superior - Maggie Smith
Rita Watson - Lauryn Hill
Father Thomas - Brad Sullivan
Maria - Alanna Ubach
Ahmal - Ryan Toby
Sketch - Ron Johnson

Two trips to the convent is one too many. Suffering a bad case of sequelitis, this “Sister Act” follow-up is too formulaic and frequently pauses to sermonize at the expense of entertaining. Although there is clearly a built-in audience eager to clap along, pic lacks the charm and buoyancy that made the first “Act” a mass-appeal hit, and a heavenly opening B.O. glow could fade quickly as the holiday sweepstakes wear on.

“Back in the Habit” is a clever subhead but also truer than intended, as “Act 2” habitually rehashes elements from the original without its inspiration.

The major shift involves the setting — a run-down high school as opposed to a decrepit convent, a milieu designed to allow the filmmakers to push an agenda counseling youths to stay in school, which would be fabulous if this were a public service announcement and not a movie.

The action opens with Deloris (Whoopi Goldberg) headlining in Vegas and rattling off a medley that, by itself, probably pushed the music-rights budget into the stratosphere. Almost immediately, however, she’s doing the nun thing again at the request of the Mother Superior (Maggie Smith), who is having a hard time reaching her young flock.

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Unfortunately, having Deloris shack up with the nuns voluntarily limits the comedic possibilities, and the lone menace this time around is rather pallid, coming in the form of an officious administrator (James Coburn) intent on closing the school.

Deloris pulls her magic act again, turning the kids into a choir in a nebulous effort to save good old St. Francis. The strategy takes shape, in fact, only after the nuns enter the kids in an all-state music competition — which is about as suspenseful as having the Buffalo Bills in the Super Bowl — assuming that a victory will keep the school open.

While all that high-spirited teenage flesh may attract a younger demographic, director Bill Duke (“A Rage in Harlem”) and writers James Orr, Jim Cruickshank and Judi Ann Mason devote themselves to reaching that segment instead of moving the story along.

The action gets bogged down, for example, in a subplot involving the talented Rita (impressive newcomer Lauryn Hill), whose mother (Sheryl Lee Ralph) objects to her involvement with the choir, pushing her to focus on more tangible goals.

Rita’s story ends up merely creating a long lull during the film’s soft midsection. Elements also seem to come from sources like “Fame” and “To Sir With Love” (“To Sister With Love”?) but amount to little more than a 1950s musical where the kids put on a show, instead set against a pretentious socially conscious 1990s backdrop.

Terrific as she was the first time around, Goldberg seems to mail in this performance, with laughs generated mostly by the mirthful Kathy Najimy and dour Mary Wickes. Even so, seeing nuns groove-rap-break dance has become a bit tiresome, and Duke and company go to that well too often.

Tech credits hit a flat note as well, with nothing magical about the choreography, and awkward editing that attempts to meld the subplots.

“Sister Act 2” accents the fact that certain films don’t readily lend themselves to sequels. The audience may ultimately disagree, but creatively, at least, it seems time to break this habit.

Sister Act 2: Back in the Habit

Production: A Buena Vista release of a Touchstone presentation of a Scott Rudin/Dawn Steel production. Produced by Steel, Rudin. Executive producers, Laurence Mark, Mario Iscovich. Co-executive producer, Christopher Meledandri. Directed by Bill Duke. Screenplay, James Orr, Jim Cruickshank, Judi Ann Mason, based on characters created by Joseph Howard.

Crew: Camera (Technicolor), Oliver Wood; editors, John Carter, Pem Herring, Stuart Pappe; music, Miles Goodman; music supervisor, Marc Shaiman; production design, John De Cuir Jr.; art direction, Louis M. Mann; set design, Lauren Cory, Sandy Getzler; set decoration, Bruce Gibeson; costume design, Francine Jamison-Tanchuck; sound (Dolby), Jim Webb; choreographer, Michael Peters; associate producers, Shaiman, Ron Stacker Thompson; assistant director, Barry Thomas; casting, Aleta Chapelle. Reviewed at the El Capitan Theater, L.A., Dec. 6, 1993. MPAA Rating: PG. Running time: 106 min.

With: Deloris - Whoopi Goldberg
Sister Mary Patrick - Kathy Najimy
Father Maurice - Barnard Hughes
Sister Mary Lazarus - Mary Wickes
Mr. Crisp - James Coburn
Father Ignatius - Michael Jeter
Sister Mary Robert - Wendy Makkena
Florence Watson - Sheryl Lee Ralph
Joey Bustamente - Robert Pastorelli
Father Wolfgang - Thomas Gottschalk
Mother Superior - Maggie Smith
Rita Watson - Lauryn Hill
Father Thomas - Brad Sullivan
Maria - Alanna Ubach
Ahmal - Ryan Toby
Sketch - Ron Johnson

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