×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

TriStar unveils new logo

To celebrate its 10th anni, TriStar Pictures’ new corporate logo hits cinemas June 19, unspooling before advance previews of “Sleepless in Seattle,” which opens the following Friday.

The logo concept was originally conceived by TriStar chairman Mike Medavoy and developed by TriStar marketing prexy Buffy Shutt and senior VP of advertising Bill Loper.

However, it was Anthony Goldschmidt’s Intralink Film Graphic Design that gave new life to the familiar Pegasus symbol.

Goldschmidt used computer special effects, models and backdrops in the process, as well as cloud footage shot from the Haleakala Crater on Maui.

Footage of the horse was shot in a hangar at the Santa Monica Airport.

Pegasus’ wings, created by combining real feathers and digitized compositing, were merged with the horse’s image via computer morphing.

“A logo for a motion picture company has enormous impact because it is the first thing that audiences see at a movie,” Goldschmidt said. “It has to be appropriate for a love story or a thriller and for a sci-fi picture and a murder myster. TriStar’s new logo — with its imagery of dawn and Pegasus — is a perfect symbol for the roster of exciting films we can expect from TriStar.”

More Film

  • RUDOLF NUREYEV 1961

    Film Review: 'Nureyev'

    It would be absurd to say that Rudolf Nureyev lived, or danced, in anyone’s shadow. He was a man who leapt and twirled and flew onstage, all muscle but light as a feather, with a freedom and force that reconfigured the human spirit. There’s no denying, though, that over the last few decades, and especially [...]

  • Die Kinder Der Toten review

    Film Review: 'Die Kinder Der Toten'

    The hills are alive (or rather, undead), with the sound of music (also mastication and the moaning of zombies) in Kelly Copper and Pavol Liska’s experimental, dialogue-free, home-movie-style riff on Elfriede Jelinek’s “Die Kinder Der Toten” (The Children of the Dead). A seminal text in Jelinek’s native Austria, the 1995 book has never been translated [...]

  • Idol review

    Film Review: 'Idol'

    How many twists can a plot undergo before it snaps? This, more than any of the many political, moral and personal conundrums that snake through “Idol,” seems to be the question writer-director Lee Su-jin is most interested in posing with his extravagantly incomprehensible sophomore feature. A seedy political thriller by way of grisly revenge movie [...]

  • The Last to See Them review

    Film Review: 'The Last to See Them'

    Truman Capote’s “In Cold Blood” stretches long as a late-evening shadow over Italian director Sara Summa’s feature debut “The Last to See Them.” The Italian title, “Gli Ultimi Viderli Vivere” which translates literally to “The Last to See Them Alive,” is also the heading of the opening chapter of Capote’s book. The setting is, similarly, [...]

  • Kalank

    Film Review: ‘Kalank’

    Events leading to the 1947 Partition of India serve as the forebodingly serious backdrop for the exhaustingly overextended razzmatazz of “Kalank,” writer-director Abhishek Varman’s lavish but ponderous Bollywood extravaganza, which opened in the U.S. on more than 300 screens the same day as its Indian release. Despite the preponderance of sets and costumes spectacular enough [...]

  • WGA Agency Packaging Fight Placeholder Writer

    WGA: 92 Percent of Writers Who Signed Statement of Support Have Fired Agents

    The Writers Guild of America estimated that over 92 percent of their members who support a new code of conduct for talent agencies have fired those representatives. Letters announcing formal termination will be delivered on Monday, the guild said in a late-hitting memo on Thursday, as most agencies will be closed tomorrow in observance of [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content