Blueberry Hill

Blueberry Hill is yet another small American film trying to cash in on a nostalgia craze that looks to be past its peak.

With:
Carrie Snodgress Margaret Avery Jennifer Rubin Matt Lattanzi Tommy Swerdlow

Blueberry Hill is yet another small American film trying to cash in on a nostalgia craze that looks to be past its peak.

Pic is set in a California town in 1956. Carrie Snodgress is a woman whose husband drowned in a local creek the night their daughter Ellie was born. She has never quite recovered from his death and has turned her house into a shrine with his pictures lining the living room walls. The only person who knows the truth about the husband is local piano teacher Hattie (Margaret Avery) who remembers him as a womanizing piano player. When Ellie (Jennifer Rubin) – now 16 – wants to know what he was like, her piano teacher takes her to the club where he played.

Best feature is the music. Avery sings ’50s jazz numbers and the soundtrack features some hit songs of the era, including the title tune. The acting doesn’t quite measure up to the story’s potential. Particularly poor is Snodgress, who chews up the scenery in a pic that might have worked better with a softer approach to the mother/daughter relationship.

Blueberry Hill

Production: Mediacom/Prism. Director Strathford Hamilton; Producer Mark Michaels; Screenplay Lonon Smith; Camera David Lewis; Editor Marcy Hamilton; Music Ira Ingber; Art Director John Sperry Wade

Crew: (Color) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1988. Running time: 87 MIN.

With: Carrie Snodgress Margaret Avery Jennifer Rubin Matt Lattanzi Tommy Swerdlow

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