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Diamonds Are Forever

James Bond still packs a lethal wallop in all his cavortings, still manages to surround himself with scantily-clad sexpots. Yet Diamonds Are Forever doesn't carry the same quality or flair as its many predecessors.

James Bond still packs a lethal wallop in all his cavortings, still manages to surround himself with scantily-clad sexpots. Yet Diamonds Are Forever doesn’t carry the same quality or flair as its many predecessors.

Sean Connery is back in the role as in five previous Bond entries, and he still has his own way both with broads and deeds. Jill St John is an agent for the smuggling ring in an attempt to smuggle a fortune in diamonds into the US, and Charles Gray the head of the organization with all the most advanced stages of nuclear energy at its disposal. Somewhere in the telling, diamonds are forgotten, never to be recalled, while Bond valiantly tries to save the world – one guesses.

The diamond caper takes Bond and his lovely companion to Las Vegas, where one of the funniest sequences in memory focuses on Bond trying to elude the police in downtown Vegas. Up-to-the-minute scientific gadget use is made again when Bond steals a moon machine at a simulated lunar testing-ground in a wild drive across the Nevada desert dunes.

1971: Nomination: Best Sound

Diamonds Are Forever

UK

  • Production: United Artists. Director Guy Hamilton; Producer Albert R. Broccoli, Harry Saltzman; Screenplay Richard Maibaum, Tom Mankiewicz; Camera Ted Moore; Editor Bert Bates, John W. Holmes; Music John Barry; Art Director Ken Adam
  • Crew: (Color) Widescreen. Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1971. Running time: 119 MIN.
  • With: Sean Connery Jill St John Charles Gray Lana Wood Jimmy Dean Bruce Cabot
  • Music By: