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Guns for San Sebastian

Anthony Quinn stars as an outcast, assumed to be a priest, in the Mexico of two centuries ago. The production, a plodding mix of religious-themed action and comedy-romance, has some good direction and battle scenes, but the very poor dubbing (in dramatic sense) is hard going.

Anthony Quinn stars as an outcast, assumed to be a priest, in the Mexico of two centuries ago. The production, a plodding mix of religious-themed action and comedy-romance, has some good direction and battle scenes, but the very poor dubbing (in dramatic sense) is hard going.

Filmed entirely in Mexico, pic is a three-way coproduction of Mexican, French and Italian companies. Based on A Wall for San Sebastian, by William Barby Faherty, story concerns Quinn’s influence on frightened mountain peasants, by which they become a cohesive town, instead of being terrorized by Charles Bronson, in league with Indian chief Jaime Fernandez.

Anjanette Comer plays a peasant gal, only one in town with slit skirts, by the way.

Sam Jaffe, as a priest who dies early and creates the situation whereby Quinn is assumed to be a cleric, is saddled with dubbed banalities. Of course, part of the fault is in the writing, acting and directing of the dubbing.

Guns for San Sebastian

France - Mexico - Italy

  • Production: M-G-M. Director Henri Verneuil; Producer Jacques Bar; Screenplay James R. Webb; Camera Armand Thirard; Editor Francoise Bonnot; Music Ennio Morricone; Art Director Robert Clavel
  • Crew: (Color) Widescreen. Extract of a review from 1968. Running time: 100 MIN.
  • With: Anthony Quinn Anjanette Comer Charles Bronson Sam Jaffe Silvia Pinal Jaime Fernandez
  • Music By: