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Come Fly with Me

Sometimes one performance can save a picture and in Come Fly with Me it's an engaging and infectious one by Pamela Tiffin. The production has other things going for it like an attractive cast, slick pictorial values and smart, stylish direction by Henry Levin, but at the base of all this sheer sheen lies a frail, frivolous and featherweight storyline that, in trying to take itself too seriously, flies into dramatic air pockets and crosscurrents that threaten to send the entire aircraft into a tailspin.

With:
Dolores Hart Hugh O'Brian Karl Boehm Pamela Tiffin Karl Malden Lois Nettleton

Sometimes one performance can save a picture and in Come Fly with Me it’s an engaging and infectious one by Pamela Tiffin. The production has other things going for it like an attractive cast, slick pictorial values and smart, stylish direction by Henry Levin, but at the base of all this sheer sheen lies a frail, frivolous and featherweight storyline that, in trying to take itself too seriously, flies into dramatic air pockets and crosscurrents that threaten to send the entire aircraft into a tailspin.

Airline hostesses and their romantic pursuits provide the peg upon which William Roberts has constructed his erratic screenplay from a screen story he concocted out of Bernard Glemser’s Girl on a Wing. The affairs of three hostesses are described.

One (Dolores Hart) is looking for a wealthy husband and thinks she’s found the fellow in a young Continental baron (Karl Boehm). Another (Lois Nettleton) is a nice girl type who succeeds in winning the heart and hand of yon multi-millionaire Texas businessman (Karl Malden). The third (Tiffin), after a series of cockpitfalls and hotelroominations, decides that flying so high with some guy in the sky is her idea of something to do. The ‘some guy’ is first flight officer Hugh O’Brian.

Much of the film was shot in Paris and Vienna.

Come Fly with Me

Production: M-G-M. Director Henry Levin; Producer Anatole de Grunwald; Screenplay William Roberts; Camera Oswald Morris; Editor Frank Clarke; Music Lyn Murray;; Art Director William Kellner

Crew: (Color) Widescreen. Extract of a review from 1963. Running time: 107 MIN.

With: Dolores Hart Hugh O'Brian Karl Boehm Pamela Tiffin Karl Malden Lois Nettleton

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