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Two Weeks in Another Town

Two Weeks in Another Town [from the novel by Irwin Shaw] is not an achievement about which any of its creative people are apt to boast.

Two Weeks in Another Town [from the novel by Irwin Shaw] is not an achievement about which any of its creative people are apt to boast.

Kirk Douglas stars as an unstable actor, fresh off a three-year hitch in sanitariums, who goes to Rome to rejoin the director (Edward G. Robinson) with whom, years earlier, he’s scored his greatest triumphs. In the course of a series of shattering incidents, Douglas comes to discover that it is upon himself alone that he must rely for the stability and strength of character with which he can fulfill his destiny.

Douglas emotes with his customary zeal and passion, but labors largely in vain to illuminate an unbelievable character. Even less believable is the character of his ex-wife, a black-as-night, hard-as-nails seductress exotically overplayed by Cyd Charisse.

Only remotely lifelike characters in the story are Robinson and Claire Trevor as an ambiguous married couple whose personalities transform under the secretive cover of night.

There is a haunting score by David Raksin. A considerable amount of footage from The Bad and the Beautiful is cleverly incorporated into the drama. As a matter of fact, the portion of the film-within-a-film is livelier than just about anything else in the film.

Two Weeks in Another Town

  • Production: M-G-M. Director Vincente Minnelli; Producer John Houseman; Screenplay Charles Schnee; Camera Milton Krasner; Editor Adrienne Fazan, Robert J. Kern Jr; Music David Raksin; Art Director George W. Davis, Urie McCleary
  • Crew: (Color) Widescreen. Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1962. Running time: 106 MIN.
  • With: Kirk Douglas Edward G. Robinson Cyd Charisse George Hamilton Daliah Lavi Claire Trevor