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Indiscreet

A beguiling love story delicately deranged by the complications of sophisticated comedy, Indiscreet is an expert film version of Norman Krasna's 1953 stage play, Kind Sir. Though tedious in its opening reels, the production warms up in direct relation to the heat of the love affair and, in the end, manages to fade out in a blaze of playful merriment.

With:
Cary Grant Ingrid Bergman Cecil Parker Phyllis Calvert David Kossoff Megs Jenkins

A beguiling love story delicately deranged by the complications of sophisticated comedy, Indiscreet is an expert film version of Norman Krasna’s 1953 stage play, Kind Sir. Though tedious in its opening reels, the production warms up in direct relation to the heat of the love affair and, in the end, manages to fade out in a blaze of playful merriment.

As the successful actress who has yet to find love, Ingrid Bergman is alluring, most affectionate and highly amusing. Cary Grant makes a ripping gadabout, conniving and gracious, his performance sometimes hilarious and always smooth.

Moving from the New York of Kind Sir, the locale has been shipped to London where Bergman lives and wants to love. Grant, a rich American who holds a NATO post, lives there too (at least on weekends, commuting as he does from Paris) and he too wants to love. But the difference is he wants nothing of marriage and, to protect all concerned, advises Bergman on first meeting that he is a married man, separated and unable to obtain a divorce. Still she invites him to the ballet.

Cecil Parker, as the brother-in-law, becomes funnier as he becomes more unnerved, and Phyllis Calvert is excellent as the sister. Megs Jenkins turns in a fine performance as the maid, and David Kossoff, as the chauffeur, admirably grabs the high spot of hilarity with his pseudo-lover stroll-on.

Popular on Variety

Indiscreet

Production: Grandon/Warner. Director Stanley Donen; Producer Stanley Donen; Screenplay Norman Krasna; Camera Frederick A. Young; Editor Jack Harris; Music Richard Rodney Bennett, Ken Jones; Art Director Don Ashton

Crew: (Color) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1958. Running time: 100 MIN.

With: Cary Grant Ingrid Bergman Cecil Parker Phyllis Calvert David Kossoff Megs Jenkins

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