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Robot Monster

Judged on the basis of novelty, as a showcase for the Tru-Stereo Process, Robot Monster comes off surprisingly well, considering the extremely limited budget ($50,000) and schedule on which the film was shot.

Judged on the basis of novelty, as a showcase for the Tru-Stereo Process, Robot Monster comes off surprisingly well, considering the extremely limited budget ($50,000) and schedule on which the film was shot.

The Tru-Stereo Process (3-D) utilized here is easy on the eyes, coming across clearly at all times. To the picture’s credit no 3-D gimmicks were employed.

Beating Arch Oboler’s Five [1951] by one survivor, yarn here concerns itself with the last six people on earth – all pitted against a mechanical monster called Ro-Man, sent from another planet whose ‘people’ are disturbed by strides being made on earth in the research fields of atomic development and space travel.

Sextet – a famed scientist, his wife, assistant, daughter and two children – are protected from Ro-Man’s supersonic death ray by anti-biotic serum.

Of the principals, George Nader, as the aide who falls in love with and eventually marries the scientist’s daughter in a primitive ceremony, fares the best. Selena Royle also comes across okay, but of the others the less said the better.

Robot Monster

  • Production: Three Dimensional. Director Phil Tucker; Producer Phil Tucker; Screenplay Wyott Ordung; Camera Jack Greenhalgh; Editor Bruce Schoengarth; Music Elmer Bernstein
  • Crew: (B&W) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1953. Running time: 62 MIN.
  • With: George Nader Claudia Barrett Selena Royle Gregory Moffett John Mylong Pamela Paulson
  • Music By: