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B.F.’s Daughter

The polished production supervision has been carefully handled to give it the expected Metro gloss, and performances are of top calibre. Script, however, makes an even more shallow exploration of the passing of a colorful era than did the John P. Marquand novel on which it is based. It's a boy meets girl story, backgrounded against the period from the early '30s into the war years. Barbara Stanwyck has been stunningly gowned and beautifully photographed.

The polished production supervision has been carefully handled to give it the expected Metro gloss, and performances are of top calibre. Script, however, makes an even more shallow exploration of the passing of a colorful era than did the John P. Marquand novel on which it is based. It’s a boy meets girl story, backgrounded against the period from the early ’30s into the war years. Barbara Stanwyck has been stunningly gowned and beautifully photographed.

Stanwyck and Van Heflin, as the two principal characters, wrap up the roles with smooth performances. Heflin gives an expressive interpretation as the poor, liberal college professor and lecturer who falls in love with and marries the daughter of an industrial giant.

Charles Coburn is his competent self as the industrialist. Richard Hart does well as the stuffy lawyer fiance who is tossed over for the poor prof. Keenan Wynn ably projects the opportunist newscaster.

B.F.’s Daughter

  • Production: M-G-M. Director Robert Z. Leonard; Producer Edwin H. Knopf; Screenplay Luther Davis; Camera Joseph Ruttenberg; Editor George White; Music Bronislau Kaper; Art Director Cedric Gibbons, Daniel B. Cathcart
  • Crew: (B&W) Extract of a review from 1948. Running time: 107 MIN.
  • With: Barbara Stanwyck Van Heflin Charles Coburn Keenan Wynn Richard Hart Margaret Lindsay
  • Music By: