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The Purple Heart

The celluloid version of the tragic events which followed the capture of eight of the American flyers who bombed Tokyo is an intensely moving piece, spellbinding though gory at times, gripping and suspenseful for the most part. Scenes depicting, by inference, the tortures which the American boys were subjected to, strike home with terrific impact. About a dozen individual performances are outstanding, with acting honors being shared fairly evenly among all the principals in the drama.

With:
Dana Andrews Richard Conte Farley Granger Sam Levene Tala Birell

The celluloid version of the tragic events which followed the capture of eight of the American flyers who bombed Tokyo is an intensely moving piece, spellbinding though gory at times, gripping and suspenseful for the most part. Scenes depicting, by inference, the tortures which the American boys were subjected to, strike home with terrific impact. About a dozen individual performances are outstanding, with acting honors being shared fairly evenly among all the principals in the drama.

Under Darryl Zanuck’s production guidance and Lewis Milestone’s deft direction, Jerome Cady’s script emerges as taut, swift-paced fare.

The story is about eight captured American flyers on trial before a Jap civil court on a murder rap, charged with purposely bombing and machine-gunning Jap civilians. Protests by Lt Wayne Greenbaum (Sam Levene) that civil courts have no jurisdiction over military prisoners and that the proceedings constitute a violation of the Geneva Convention are ignored. Action takes place mainly in the Jap courtroom, with war correspondents from Axis nations only admitted.

The Purple Heart

Production: 20th Century-Fox. Director Lewis Milestone; Producer Darryl F. Zanuck; Screenplay Jerome Cady; Camera Arthur Miller; Editor Douglas Biggs; Music Alfred Newman; Art Director James Baseri, Lewis Creber

Crew: (B&W) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1944. Running time: 90 MIN.

With: Dana Andrews Richard Conte Farley Granger Sam Levene Tala Birell

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