Review: ‘Zaza’

In the third presentation of the play [following versions in 1915 and 1923], Paramount has retained basic fundamentals of the original [play by Pierre Berton and Charles Simon], but adaptation injects new treatment of the early 1900 story to freshen it up materially.

In the third presentation of the play [following versions in 1915 and 1923], Paramount has retained basic fundamentals of the original [play by Pierre Berton and Charles Simon], but adaptation injects new treatment of the early 1900 story to freshen it up materially.

Zaza is a mischievous and flirtatious vaude soubrette in France. Forcing introduction with Herbert Marshall, pair fall in love and launch an affair.

Claudette Colbert hits a sincere and scintillating portrayal of the frivolous and tempestuous Zaza. Her coy flirtation with Marshall, and later dramatic passages are a finely tempered characterization.

Marshall capably handles the role of the husband.

Play does not lend itself to fast-paced picture technique, and director George Cukor wisely steers away from trying to make such a radical change.

Zaza

Production

Paramount. Director George Cukor; Producer Albert Lewin; Screenplay Zoe Akins; Camera Charles Lang Jr; Editor Edward Dmytryk; Music Frederick Hollander; Art Director Hans Dreier, Earl Hedrick

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1939. Running time: 83 MIN.

With

Claudette Colbert Herbert Marshall Bert Lahr Helen Westley Constance Collier Genevieve Tobin
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