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Every Day’s a Holiday

By whatever standard posterity judges the acting career of Mae West, it never shall be said that she was dull. Every Day's a Holiday, written by herself, is a lively, innocuously bawdy and rowdy entertainment.

By whatever standard posterity judges the acting career of Mae West, it never shall be said that she was dull. Every Day’s a Holiday, written by herself, is a lively, innocuously bawdy and rowdy entertainment.

West’s new characterization is of a Bowery girl named Peaches O’Day, one time actress of the 1890s, a con-girl, with liberal views on the subject of larceny.

Most action of the story takes place in New York on New Year’s, 1900. Peaches trims a yokel for $200. Under threat of arrest Peaches takes the boat to Boston, hoping that time will assuage the criminal complaint. Then she disguises as Mlle Fifi, and returns to Broadway as a French music-hall singer. Her disguise is good, although not good enough to deceive Capt McCarey (Edmund Lowe), chief of detectives.

Through all this, West sways her hips and tosses her plumes in her inimitable manner. She sings a not very naughty song by Sam Coslow. There is substantial comedy relief supplied by Charles Winninger, as the blustering chairman of the reformers; Charles Butterworth, his butler and political adviser; Walter Catlett, play producer; and Lloyd Nolan, the crooked boss. Louis Armstrong leads his band in a street parade

Every Day’s a Holiday

  • Production: Paramount. Director A. Edward Sutherland; Producer Emanuel Cohen; Screenplay Mae West; Camera Karl Struss; Editor Ray Curtiss; Music George Stoll (dir.); Art Director Wiard Ihnen
  • Crew: (B&W) Extract of a review from 1937. Running time: 80 MIN.
  • With: Mae West Edmund Lowe Charles Butterworth Charles Winninger Walter Catlett Lloyd Nolan
  • Music By: