Al Gore: ‘There’s Hope’ for Climate Change Solutions in ‘An Inconvenient Sequel’

A decade after Al Gore debuted his climate change documentary “An Inconvenient Truth,” he’s hitting Sundance to talk about its follow-up, “An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power.” Joined by directors Jon Shenk and Bonnie Cohen and executive producer Jeff Skoll at the Variety Studio presented by Orville Redenbacher, Gore said the new film isn’t all doom and gloom.

“The climate crisis can be a forbidding topic if you allow yourself to sink into despair,” he said. “A lot of damage is being done and a lot is at risk, but in the ten years or so since the first movie was made, the progress in developing solutions has been just extraordinary.”

Of the people who have seen “An Inconvenient Sequel” that he’s heard from, he added, “They appreciate getting an update on the science and the really kind of scary stuff that’s going on. But they even more appreciate the fact that they come away hopeful and energized.”

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  1. YosemiteDan says:

    Al Gore is wanting a bigger pay check. The sky is falling the sky is falling.

  2. There has not been any “extraordinary progress” as claimed. There has been a great deal of discussion about mitigation and much less about adaption, but I have read through most of the available literature published online for many years and the actual amount of progress is minimal. It is in fact, as the US Government reports “nascent” (minimal, from the Third National Climate Assessment, 841 pages).

    What is startling clear to any real investigation into this issue is how incredibly little has actually been done, how incomplete their understanding of forthcoming effects truly is, and that the that the “intended response to climate impacts is not going to be the right response, primarily due to the failure to assess the viability of civilization within the known scale of cascading climate impacts” (from Life Ship project outline).

    Humanity is not being properly prepared or informed. I will see Gore’s film when it is available to me, but I doubt very much that meaningful progress towards mitigation or adaption is being accurately told.