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Inside Move

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The wife of Viacom chairman and CEO Sumner Redstone, whose company is currently involved in a $37 billion deal to acquire CBS Inc., has filed for divorce and is seeking $3 billion, her attorney said Sunday.

Review: ‘You Be Ted and I’ll Be Sylvia’

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There are far better plays in London — most of them, actually — than “You Be Ted and I’ll Be Sylvia,” but I doubt there’s a braver actress currently on view than Nichola McAuliffe. Not many plays require the leading lady to portray an insufferable lesbian snob with an incestuous past who ends her days in full and gory view of the audience submerged in an onstage tank. Add in the realization that McAuliffe came late to Simon Smith’s play, following the departure of original lead Kathryn Pogson (London’s first Aunt Dan in the Wallace Shawn play), and it becomes clear that McAuliffe deserves more than applause. How about a red badge of courage?

Review: ‘Stark Raving Mad’

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At least on paper, this half-hour would practically need to trash the memory of Mother Teresa and promote the agenda of the Aryan Nation to avoid landing in the household ratings top 10. Ah, but mitigating factors abound. “Frasier” and “ER” are both arguably past their primes. And the competition has improved dramatically, no longer conceding the night, and perhaps even smelling a little blood. “Stark Raving Mad” is no slam-dunk when the opposition includes the high-profile new Fox satire “Action,” the rejiggered “Chicago Hope,” the WB hit “Charmed” and — never laugh at a ratings winner — professional wrestling on UPN.

Review: ‘Snoops’

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What the show does have is Gina Gershon (“Bound,” “Showgirls”), who can start a fire with a mere quiver of that pouty bottom lip. Gershon’s high-octane allure remains mostly intact here as she plays Glenn Hall, a savvy seductress of an L.A. private eye who has been known to sleep with targets to get them busted.

Review: ‘Simpatico – Cast Gives Comedy a Boost’

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An unbeatable cast lends satisfying emotional texture to “Simpatico,” a melancholy comedy adapted by Brit stage vet turned first-time feature helmer Matthew Warchus (with David Nicholls) from Sam Shepard’s 1994 play. Determinedly low-key pic, more impressive in its fine-tuned details than overall resonance, likely will ride good reviews and the marquee names — Jeff Bridges, Nick Nolte , Sharon Stone — to middling B.O. pull to respectable, if modest, results when Fine Line opens it Stateside on Dec. 17.

Review: ‘Once and Again’

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A most convincing argument that there is life after 40, ABC’s new drama “Once and Again” goes directly against the grain of the current teen infatuation to focus on two families coping with divorce, separation and dating. Edward Zwick and Marshall Herskovitz (“thirtysomething,” “My So-Called Life”) have once again created an intricate tapestry of emotions and events, generations and perspectives into one of the best shows of the new fall season.

Review: ‘Odd Man Out’

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Actually, Post won’t need to do it all by herself. In fact, she is scarcely even the focal point of “Odd Man Out.” That would be teenager Erik von Detten. He portrays Andrew, a hormonally charged 15-year-old (read: redundant) who goes through life in a state of perpetual befuddlement over the opposite sex.

Review: ‘Now and Again’

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From startto finish, the hour keeps viewers entertainingly off-balance. It shifts tones constantly — a sci-fi thriller one minute, a black comedy the next. To be sure, “Now and Again” promises to provide supporters with a strangely endearing ride, if it manages to survive its semi-stiff competition (ABC’s “T.G.I.F.” lineup, “Dateline NBC” — benefiting from a “Providence” lead-in — and the new Chris Carter paranoid romp “Harsh Realm”).

Review: ‘Law & Order: Special Victims Unit’

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Stuck in one of television’s worst timeslots — Mondays, opposite kickoff of the football game — this “Law & Order” spinoff wastes no time getting to a juicy crime and expertly tucking the necessary character exposition into a handful of scenes that propel the drama.

Review: ‘Low’

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If less is more, Low is the most. It would be simplistic to call the Duluth, Minn.-bred band’s approach minimalism, but it would be more appropriate to call it “essentialism.” Nothing is missing from the trio’s sound, but all the stage lighting, snare drums, ornate lyrics are stripped away, leaving a dramatic starkness, a constantly building tension that’s subtly overpowering.