Gloria Steinem Gets a Standing Ovation at Michael Moore’s Broadway Opening

Michael Moore Broadway Terms of My
Joan Marcus

Gloria Steinem got a mid-show standing ovation at the Broadway opening night of Michael Moore’s “The Terms of My Surrender,” after the feminist icon made a rousing surprise appearance in Moore’s Broadway debut.

Steinem, the latest in a list of special guests that have included Bryan Cranston and Maxine Waters, discussed the renewed push to pass the Equal Rights Amendment and predicted the end of the electoral college. She also struck a note of optimism in a show that’s largely activated by outrage over the rise of Trump.

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“I’m a hope-aholic,” Steinem said in conversation with Moore on stage at the Belasco Theater Aug. 10. “Though it’s incredibly dangerous what happened, it awakened — We are woke now. We are seriously woke.”

The talk with Steinem was part of a show that touched on both the personal and political, from Moore’s diagnosis of the current state of the Democrats to a story about his teenage campaign for a spot on the school board. He also talked about the day’s news — although perhaps not quite as much as might be expected by audiences anticipating a ripped-from-the-headlines standup routine.

He’d rather leave hot-takes on the day’s news to late-night comedians, Moore told Variety at the show’s opening night party at Bryant Park Grill. “We all think that Trump is easily distracted by shiny keys, but the truth is: He’s the one holding the shiny keys, and we’re the ones distracted,” he said. “He threatens North Korea with fire and fury — He doesn’t mean that! He’s been too lazy to appoint an ambassador to South Korea! It’s a distraction so we don’t cover what we should really be covering about him.”

The traditional Broadway demographic tends to share the same left-leaning beliefs that Moore does, but he doesn’t believe that preaching to the choir is necessarily a bad thing — not when the choir is so demoralized.

“This choir needs a song to sing,” he said. “This choir’s been depressed since November.”

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  1. There have been hundreds of unsuccessful proposed amendments to modify or abolish the Electoral College – more than any other subject of Constitutional reform.
    To abolish the Electoral College would need a constitutional amendment, and could be stopped by states with as little as 3% of the U.S. population.

    Instead, pragmatically, The National Popular Vote bill is 61% of the way to guaranteeing the majority of Electoral College votes and the presidency to the candidate who receives the most popular votes in the country, by changing state winner-take-all laws (not mentioned in the U.S. Constitution, but later enacted by 48 states), without changing anything in the Constitution, using the built-in method that the Constitution provides for states to make changes.

    All voters would be valued equally in presidential elections, no matter where they live.
    Candidates, as in other elections, would allocate their time, money, polling, organizing, and ad buys roughly in proportion to the population

    Every vote, everywhere, for every candidate, would be politically relevant and equal in every presidential election.
    No more distorting, crude, and divisive and red and blue state maps of predictable outcomes, that don’t represent any minority party voters within each state.
    No more handful of ‘battleground’ states (where the two major political parties happen to have similar levels of support) where voters and policies are more important than those of the voters in 38+ predictable states that have just been ‘spectators’ and ignored after the conventions.

    The bill would take effect when enacted by states with a majority of the electoral votes—270 of 538.
    All of the presidential electors from the enacting states will be supporters of the presidential candidate receiving the most popular votes among all 50 states (and DC)—thereby guaranteeing that candidate with an Electoral College majority.

    In 2017, the bill has passed the New Mexico Senate and Oregon House.
    The bill was approved in 2016 by a unanimous bipartisan House committee vote in both Georgia (16 electoral votes) and Missouri (10).
    Since 2006, the bill has passed 35 state legislative chambers in 23 rural, small, medium, large, red, blue, and purple states with 261 electoral votes.
    The bill has been enacted by 11 small, medium, and large jurisdictions with 165 electoral votes – 61% of the way to guaranteeing the presidency to the candidate with the most popular votes in the country

    NationalPopularVote

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