Must-See Weed TV (Where Pot Is the Star)

Must See Weed TV
Courtesy of Netflix/Vice/Comedy Central

Pot on television has come a long way in a decade. In 2006, “That ’70s Show” wrapped having completed eight seasons and never showing or even referencing marijuana despite its ubiquitousness in teenage basements everywhere. Today, there’s a wealth of weed options available on the small screen — from cooking shows to comedies to how-tos and makeovers, the fall TV season is looking awfully hazy.

Bong Appetit
Viceland; Viceland

Hosted by noted columnist and cannabis expert Saeed, this gourmet food and ganja show challenges various chefs to come up with novel recipes that will get people very high. As with a typical cooking series, dishes are created from scratch, but using the many THC-infused products stored in the kitchen’s vaunted pantry. Dinner guests including ex-NBA player John Salley and actress Christina Milian get whacked on the delicious cannabis-infused concoctions. In contrast to the fake pot often used in TV shows, it’s all very real on this Viceland favorite.
Stars: Abdullah Saeed, Vanessa Lavorato, Ry Prichard Status: Season 3 premieres Sept. 14.

Broad City
Comedy Central; 3 Arts Entertainment, Jax Media, Paper Kite Productions

Glazer and Jacobson play two twentysomething stoners who live on the edge in New York. It’s a familiar concept — a couple of pothead pals and their daily urban hijinks — but it’s not as common to see women in the buddy comedy roles usually reserved for the likes of Cheech & Chong or Harold and Kumar. Still, “Broad City” deserves some of the credit for hoisting Buress’ career, and Ilana and Abbi, while not as catchy as Wayne and Garth, seem equally poised for success beyond cable.
Stars: Ilana Glazer, Abbi Jacobson, Hannibal Buress Status: Season 4 premieres Sept. 13.

Disjointed
Netflix; Chuck Lorre Productions, Warner Bros. Television

Bates plays ’60s earth mother Ruth Whitefeather Feldman, who decides to open a marijuana dispensary in her AARP years. It’s a fairly predictable show, with a kooky cast and lots of pot gags. But Netflix is a new world for Lorre, and he takes full advantage with plenty of foul language that would never cut it on network TV. While one character talks to the pot plants in the basement, another wrestles with PTSD from two tours in Iraq. The DEA raid in the final episode of season one shows how shops like Ruth’s Alternative Caring live in a perilous gray area between state and federal laws. However, some viewers have an issue with the laugh track.
Stars: Kathy Bates, Aaron Moten, Tone Bell Status: Currently available via Netflix

Martha & Snoop’s Potluck Dinner
VH1; VH1 Productions, 495 Productions

The mainstreaming of Snoop Dogg is complete with this cooking/talk show he shares with America’s favorite homemaker Martha Stewart, and executive produced under the Merry Jane banner (of which he is a principal). The two whip up dishes as they gab with guests (mostly rappers and comedians). Snoop and Stewart are nominated together in the host for a reality or reality-competition program category.
Stars: Martha Stewart, Snoop Dogg, Anna Ross Status: Season 2 begins Oct. 16.

Pimp My Grow
Amazon Prime, AppleTV,
Roku, AndroidTV, Daily Motion, MetaCafe, Facebook, NowThis; Prohbtd
B-Real, of rap-rock bands Cypress Hill and Prophets of Rage, has long been known in cannabis circles as Dr. Greenthumb. He brings his expertise to master cultivators and breeders at DNA Genetics by turning ordinary grow rooms into fine-tuned, high-yielding systems. Taking a cue from home improvement and car shows, the talk is of dirt and hydro, basements to greenhouses to backyard gardens, and these ganja geeks have all the answers.
Stars: B-Real, DNA Genetics Status: In Production

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    1. John Thomas says:

      Regarding “Disjointed,” writer Bloom says:

      >>>some viewers have an issue with the laugh track.”

      That’s an understatement. – It’s more like a fingernail screeching across a black-board!

      What it really is is instruction to the audience as to where something is funny and where they should laugh. If the humor were strong enough, that insulting condescension wouldn’t be necessary. – The icing on this horrific cake is it’s patently phony and thus assaults the necessary suspension of disbelief.

      This utterly wrong direction, unfortunately, represents the entire production of Disjointed. – Bates is an incredible talent, but nothing can save this turkey. Disjointed is simply bad television. – It’s just a lame Cheers rip-off. – The whole concept is ludicrous for marijuana vendors. – If they want to portray this kind of “community,” they need to make it happen in a vapor lounge. – I know. There aren’t many yet.

      Showtime’s “Weeds” set the bar for marijuana comedy (dramedy?) very high in the last decade. Producers should aspire to that level of story telling, instead of giving us retro 80’s sitcoms that are mostly boring.

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