‘The Mummy’ Leads International Box Office, ‘Pirates of the Caribbean’ 5 Crosses $500 Million

The Mummy
Courtesy of Universal

The Mummy” is closing in on $300 million worldwide after leading the international box office for the second consecutive weekend.

The Tom Cruise vehicle had a disappointing $32.2 million opening weekend in North America and a steep drop-off during week two. But overseas, it’s on track to earn $53 million in 68 territories this weekend, which would raise its international total to $239 million.

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Universal and Illumination’s “Despicable Me 3” brought in almost $10 million abroad, ahead of its U.S. release. The animated movie opened in Australia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand to tie in with local school holidays.

For Disney, “Cars 3” opened to $21.3 million in a handful of markets, including Russia and Mexico. Next weekend the movie will open Australia and New Zealand as part of its gradual global rollout.

The same studio’s “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Talescrossed the $500 million mark abroad after tacking on $18.8 million more this weekend.

Warner Bros. and DC Comics’ “Wonder Woman” continues to be a force at the international markets as well, taking in an estimated $39.5 million this weekend behind “The Mummy.”

All this on the same weekend that “Cars 3” is winning in the North American market with $53.5 million. Tupac biopic “All Eyez on Me” also saw a strong opening in the weekend, overtaking fellow newcomers “47 Meters Down,” “Rough Night,” and “The Book of Henry.”

More numbers will be added to this report as they are announced.

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  1. Austin-Tyler Whitley says:

    The Mummy is an amazing movie. I’m so glad it is doing so well.

  2. Tuck says:

    International audiences love crap.

  3. paully says:

    Like Transformers 5 (?) this is a US product intended for international consumption..

  4. Denyse Prendergast says:

    Perhaps we can now stop referring to ‘The Mummy’ as a flop? Action films earn 60-70% of their profits overseas; the global market is more lucrative than ours. Americans should consider that we aren’t the only audience for films and for many of them, we are not the final arbiter of success.

    • Syedah Johnson says:

      Thank you! Never seen a movie do so well financially but he called a flop.

    • Joe says:

      Scientology cultists see every Cruise movie as a success, even “Losin’ it”. Tom, can’t do no wrong…

    • Nikki says:

      How many things mes can a loyal scientologist cult member see a movie? A LOT.

    • merio says:

      Stupidly said. Think a little before shooting an “anti-american-speech”. Thinking doesn’t hurt… though it seems hurting for some people.

      Till very recently, a movie’s boxoffice was split into 40-50% domestically + 60-50% international. Lately, the international market has been increasing since countries like China, India … are getting a huge middle-class. Is it good or bad? I would say, it is “good”, but companies would prefer to get that increase domestically. For any patriotic pro-america-rule-the-world-and-we-are-better-than-you-all reason? Not at all. It is more simple. American movies are made in america, with american money, so, american taxes basically. From domestic box office, companies get aprox. 50% of it as benefits (rest 50% is for distributors, exhibitor, theaters…). And internationally, depends on the deal made with each country, but is by far less than domestically. Let’s say, 35%. And in China, for example, it’s even less. I think some 20-25% of China’s boxoffice goes to the company and 70-75% stays in the country.

      So, again, put your mind to work a bit before posting your “anti-american-getting-thumbs-up-likes-from-forum trolls” speech.

      • merio says:

        Ok, let’s make a rough simple picture here for someone simple like you can understand it.

        – Imagine a movie makes 200M domesticalle + 200M internationally = 400M worldwide. Clear so far? Ok.
        – That movie is made by Universal in Hollywood, and costs 80M to produce + 80M to marketing/distribution = 160M total expenses.
        – From the 200M dom, it gets approximately 50% as income, so 100M win by Universal.
        – From the 200M intl. it gets approximately 30% as income, so 60M win by Universal. (that 30% is an average, cause depends on the deal made between governments … for example, in China, that share gets reduced to 25%, and in Europe it gets higher).
        – So, the business guys in Universal make numbers … costs = 160M, incomes = 160M … we do not get a single dollar. FANTASTIC!!!
        – Now imagine they make 350M domestically (175M income) and 50M internationally (15M income). Then the business guys in Universal get their calculators on and see they are making 190M income … 30M benefits!!! WOAAAA!!!!!

        Do you get now why is important for studios to have an as big as possible domestic boxoffice? It0s not because they think America is the best and there’s nothing important beyond. It’s jus about numbers and business.

      • Michelle says:

        P.S. Speaking of thinking before you speak, the money these American movies are making overseas STILL GOES TO THE AMERICAN COMPANY THAT MADE THE MOVIE. Just like when Ford sells a car to a person in China, FORD STILL GETS PAID. So what are you talking about?

      • Michelle says:

        This is patently untrue. American movies are filmed all over the world with producer money which may or may not be American in origin.

        Saying that a movie that did VERY well internationally but not in America is a HORRIBLE career-ending movie smacks of conceit on the part of the American media, even if it says nothing about the general American public. There’s NOTHING anti-American about saying that, either. What’s anti-American is thinking you can’t criticize America without being anti-American.

    • Kevin Miller says:

      Well said.

      • merio says:

        Ok, let’s make a rough simple picture here for someone simple like you can understand it.

        – Imagine a movie makes 200M domesticalle + 200M internationally = 400M worldwide. Clear so far? Ok.
        – That movie is made by Universal in Hollywood, and costs 80M to produce + 80M to marketing/distribution = 160M total expenses.
        – From the 200M dom, it gets approximately 50% as income, so 100M win by Universal.
        – From the 200M intl. it gets approximately 30% as income, so 60M win by Universal. (that 30% is an average, cause depends on the deal made between governments … for example, in China, that share gets reduced to 25%, and in Europe it gets higher).
        – So, the business guys in Universal make numbers … costs = 160M, incomes = 160M … we do not get a single dollar. FANTASTIC!!!
        – Now imagine they make 350M domestically (175M income) and 50M internationally (15M income). Then the business guys in Universal get their calculators on and see they are making 190M income … 30M benefits!!! WOAAAA!!!!!

        Do you get now why is important for studios to have an as big as possible domestic boxoffice? It0s not because they think America is the best and there’s nothing important beyond. It’s jus about numbers and business.

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