David Freyne’s Zombie Thriller ‘The Cured’ With Ellen Page Sells Abroad (EXCLUSIVE)

David Freyne’s Zombie Thriller 'The Cured'
TIFF

The Cured,” David Freyne’s zombie thriller with Ellen Page and Sam Keeley, has secured several distribution deals ahead of its world premiere in the Toronto International Film Festival’s Special Presentation section Saturday.

Bac Films, which handles international sales on the film, has closed deals for Greece (Spentzos), Turkey (Filmdom), the Middle East (Falcon), Hong Kong (Bravos), Malaysia and Indonesia (Tanweer), Singapore (Shaw), Taiwan (Caichang), Thailand (Sahamongkol), Vietnam (Skyline) and Philippines (Silverline). WME, CAA and Bac Films represent North American rights.

Freyne’s feature debut, “The Cured” takes place in a world that has just survived a zombie plague and revolves around Senan (Keeley), a cured zombie who is now facing discrimination, and his sister-in-law Abbie (Page), who is willing to give him a second chance. Social issues arise due to widespread discrimination against once-infected zombies, leading to militant government interference.

Bac Films’ Gilles Sousa said the banner has kept most key territories open in order to have the option to work with a multi-territory distributor or streaming service, and is looking to close deals following the film’s world premiere.

“The Cured” was produced by Tilted Pictures and Bac Films in association with Savage Prods. Bac Films will also distribute in France.

Bac Films’ Toronto slate also includes Paolo Virzi’s “The Leisure Seeker,” which world premiered at Venice and will play at Toronto in the Gala section; Helene Cattet and Bruno Forzani’s thriller “Let’s the Corpses Tan,” the Belgian helmer’s follow-up to the giallo-inspired “The Strange Color of Your Body’s Tears”; and “Amer,” which will play at Toronto’s Midnight Madness. Other Bac Films titles include Sofia Djama’s “The Blessed,” which world premiered at Venice.

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  1. R.M.G. van Os says:

    Interesting. First they were only good for horror movies, to be feared and to run away from ( or else to gorily decapitate in ultimate and gory frenzy). Then they were to be understood and better dealt with, to such a point even that the top television show about Walkers is more about the conflict between living humans than about the dead still eating the living. And now we are supposed to start feeling sorry for them? I don’t know if going in the direction of GUESS WHO’S COMING TO DINNER with Zombies is the way to go. Or is it that Zombies as a theme is again coming to an end??? Maybe I’m wrong. I’ll gladly wait and see.

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