PopPolitics: ‘Cries From Syria’ Director Says Trump’s Refugee Ban May Help ISIS Recruitment (Listen)

Cries From Syria Director: Trump Refugee
Courtesy of Sundance Film Festival

Evgeny Afineevsky, director of “Cries From Syria,” which debuts Monday night on HBO, suggests that President Donald Trump’s revised travel ban could actually be used as a way for terrorism groups to recruit young refugees seeking shelter and relief from the war-torn region.

“Most of the kids that are trying to survive under this mess — they are seeking shelter,” Afineevsky tells Variety‘s “PopPolitics” on SiriusXM. “Shutting doors in front of these children, we are allowing ISIS or al-Qaeda to take these children under their wing, give them shelter, but at the same time create from them terrorists.”

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Trump’s revised travel order, issued last week, restricts travel from Somalia, Iran, Syria, Sudan, Libya, and Yemen, and temporarily suspends the refugee program for 120 days.

“Cries From Syria” traces the civil war in Syria from its origins, often through the eyes of children who have witnessed brutality and devastation in the country, and later the migration from the region in hopes of stability and shelter.

Afineevsky, who is a U.S. citizen, said that what the U.S. government is “shutting doors for people who are seeking shelter. They are not trying to learn about the roots of terrorism itself, but they are trying to do a quick and easy way to just shut the doors.”

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“PopPolitics,” hosted by Variety‘s Ted Johnson, airs Thursdays from 2-3 pm ET/11 am to noon PT on SiriusXM’s political channel POTUS. It also is available on demand. 

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  1. A-a-ron says:

    They do not need to come here, that is too expensive. We need to help them fight Assad and help them in their country. We need to stand up to Russia on the Syrian front (even though they are not there anymore so that doesn’t even matter). They need to return and fight again.

  2. Terry says:

    The islamic terrorists hate us no matter what we do or don’t do. Their goal is to wipe out all non-believers of their religion. I am tired of hearing that the islamic terrorists hate us because we do this, or because we do that. They hate us because we exist and don’t believe in their religion.

    • I found this an very moving, interesting film. It was refreshing to be able to watch something without all the political viewpoints, just from the people. Most of whom want to rebuild and return. What I did not see and would like to know is , how can we help them to return?? All governments aside, is there a fund to help buy lumber, cement, furniture to help to rebuild? A fund or “go fund me” to help these men work to rebuild, to return home? Schools supplies? This can be a humanitarian thing, not a government thing. Just mho, as it seems this is something people could do voluntarily.

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