YouTube’s Fine Brothers Entertainment Will Let Fans Create Their Own ‘React’ Videos

Fine Brothers - Benny and Rafi
Courtesy of Fine Brothers Entertainment

Fine Brothers Entertainment, creators of the popular “React” franchises on YouTube, is hoping to grow its fanbase — and make money — by granting creators licenses to make their own versions of the shows.

The company’s React World will aggregate videos in a channel to launch later this year to promote, support and feature fan-produced programming based on their shows, which revolve around showing people reacting to viral YouTube videos. FBE said React World will also serve as an online community for discussion and entertainment around the reaction genre of shareable video content worldwide.

Besides fostering a fan community, FBE wants to be able to monetize “React”-style videos through its own channels rather than having that content appear on unaffiliated outlets. The move promises to expand the company’s presence as a multichannel network.

“By offering our shows and trademarks to the world, we will expand the Fine Family by leaps and bounds globally, and support content that can make a positive impact around the world,” FBE founders Benny and Rafi Fine (who are actual brothers) said in announcing the initiative.

FBE is providing a license to creators worldwide to 11 of its shows and trademarks in the franchise: “Kids React,” “Teens React,” “Elders React,” “Adults React,” “React Gaming,” “Do They Know It,” “People Vs Food,” “Lyric Breakdown,” “Try Not to Smile or Laugh,” “Opinions” and “People Vs Technology.” Along with the license, the company will provide ongoing production guidance, creative guidelines, format bibles, graphics and other resources to producers. Anyone can create a YouTube channel and license the “React” formats right away, and the license will also be available for other video platforms in the future.

The move comes after Fine Brothers Entertainment filed for trademark protection on “React” with the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office in July 2015. The application covers “Entertainment services, namely, providing an ongoing series of programs and webisodes via the Internet in the field of observing and interviewing various groups of people.”

“The Fine Brothers have been innovators on YouTube since day one, so it’s no surprise that they’ve created a unique way to expand the hugely popular ‘React’ series to YouTube audiences around the globe,” Kelly Merryman, YouTube’s VP of content partnerships, said in a statement. “This is brand-building in the YouTube age — rising media companies building their brands through collaborations with creators around the world.”

FBE said it is working closely with YouTube on the launch of “React World,” and is partnering with ChannelMeter to provide back-end video analytics and global payments. Matt Labate, VP of Fine Brother Entertainment’s channel group, oversees the company’s digital channels, which will include React World.

Fine Brothers Entertainment have more than 20 million subscribers across their YouTube channels and generate over 150 million monthly views. The brothers are currently in production on “Sing It,” in partnership with Mandeville Films, for the YouTube Red subscription service. FBE last summer premiered their 10-episode TV series “Six Degrees of Everything” on truTV and previously produced 12 primetime episodes of “ReactToThat” for Nickelodeon.

Watch the Fine Brothers’ video announcing React World:

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  1. Justin says:

    Let them? Fuck you Fine brothers. You didn’t let anyone do anything. People called you out on your total bs claim and you ran away and hid from the backlash.

  2. What pathetic losers… No, not the Fine Brothers. I mean most to all these comments and the people — no, the children who made them. Yes, we are all upset that Micheal Jackson owned the rights to “Happy Birthday” and Disney owns the rights to “superheroes”, but the Fine Brothers were trying to take down your “little brother reacts to new baby” or even the “Kid’s Say the Darnedest Things” videos. They were looking to do as all creator do and protect their shows, but find a way to share with others rather than be Disney/Marvel or whatever.

    Yes, they ran into two problems. One, the name of the shows were made to gather clicks, but that made them too generic to copyright or trademark. And two, they weren’t certain how far to take the protection.

    Obviously, if you make a serious video to look like theirs or use their names to get your own clicks, you are both a thieving scoundrel and breaking the law. But aside from the set design, the logos, and the music, it gets questionable where their rights are and, by law, they have to protect them or lose their hold, just like the product name Aspirin became a generic term.

    On the positive side, they are well connected to their viewers and bright enough to fix the error quickly. And now all the jerks who unsubscribed for a simple error can be as hole-ish as their asses are, because they aren’t the type of human who should handle complicated equipment like a pen. They could hurt themselves.

    • Sigmund Froyd says:

      They are protected under their Channel’s YouTube copyright laws. If someone steals their content and monitizes it they can have their channel taken down (depending on how much is taken).

      What these guys are doing is NOT protecting their videos, their brand (even though its not theirs). They are forcing other users to pay licensing fees to monitize REACT videos which still go through THEIR channel.

      Its shady and bad business. And they have not corrected their mistake because of the fans, they are being corrected because of all the counter claims being brought against them since REACT can’t be trademarked, its a common term.

      These clowns deserve losing over 6 million subs for forcing us to pay licensing fees for making videos on YouTube that in no way concerns them.

  3. James says:

    The video that was posted and taken down is a clear sign you are on the wrong side. Innovative isn’t getting what every single thing does, even chemicals, and forcing them to pay a fee because they added more people reacting, and that is innovating. And congratulations I have just Reacted to this article and have just received my subpoena at my door.

    • Sigmund Froyd says:

      They are protected under their Channel’s YouTube copyright laws. If someone steals their content and monitizes it they can have their channel taken down (depending on how much is taken).

      What these guys are doing is NOT protecting their videos, their brand (even though its not theirs). They are forcing other users to pay licensing fees to monitize REACT videos which still go through THEIR channel.

      Its shady and bad business. And they have not corrected their mistake because of the fans, they are being corrected because of all the counter claims being brought against them since REACT can’t be trademarked, its a common term.

      These clowns deserve losing over 6 million subs for forcing us to pay licensing fees for making videos on YouTube that in no way concerns them.

  4. Javier Navarro says:

    If Youtube allows these clowns to go after users the way they plan, Google will loose one of its cash cows. There is daily motion and other sites for user hosting. Google/Alphabet has more to loose than the fine bros if they allow it.

  5. lindsey says:

    These guys have always been hacks – almost a decade worth of unfunny material on YouTube.

  6. nuttapillar says:

    “20 million subscribers”, lol, not anymore!
    try less than 14 million now.

  7. CowOnHead says:

    These jabronis didn’t invent anything. The problem is that they didn’t invent it and this is one of the most commonly used concepts on youtube. Even more aggravating is that
    The confusion is what exactly did they trademark. They make it sound like they trademarked the CONCEPT of reaction videos and everyone is angry/worried that they’ll start going after everyone.
    They made it sound like they own the concept of deep-fried potatoes.

  8. shaw says:

    This article will need to be updated, as their subscriber count has now fallen well below 20 million after this terrible money grab was announced.

  9. Nicolas Escobar says:

    These jerks are trademarking a concept they didn’t invent and then bullying people with lawyers. “React” videos have literally been around since before these scumbags were born. Now they want to shut down any and everyone who wants to make their own content.

  10. Dengar says:

    Do commenters here even know what a trademark is?

  11. bonsky21 says:

    Someone please start a campaign to get their trademark reviewed and revoked for being both a common term and having prior art. I’m tired of hearing about these two ‘up and coming’ trend chasers who found a loophole that would allow them to temporarily cash in. They rank down there with the youtube ‘Reply Girls’ phenomenon and Josh Ostrovsky.

  12. beedogs says:

    I hope these two turds die broke, alone, in a gutter. Trademarking the word “react” and then suing folks for it isn’t a god damned business.

  13. Joe Meeker says:

    “FBE wants to be able to monetize “React”-style videos through its own channels rather than having that content appear on unaffiliated outlets.”

    Should read: “FBE wants to monetize other peoples’ content by forcing them to put it on React World through shady legal bludgeoning, rather than allowing content creators to monetize their own content on their own channels.”

  14. Todd Pomme says:

    They are NOT the creators of the ‘React’ video. How much work did the writer of this article actually put forth in researching that? This is shady all around, please look further into this Variety. React videos have existed since before 2012, heck before YouTube. Trademarking the word “react” so that other pioneering content creators cannot use it? Telling content creators they are ‘stealing’ because they are using some amorphous format the Fine Bros still have not legally defined? This is the future of YouTube? Really? Anyone reading this please do your research and familiarize yourself with copywright law, how trademarking works, and then look up what exactly the Fine Bros have trademarked and what that means. If you use YouTube at all, for anything, this is your issue too.

  15. Mik548 says:

    Fine Brothers is just trying to license their videos so no one else can compete with them, even though they weren’t the ones that started reaction videos! Youtube was created as a free way to upload any content you want, Fine Brothers is now trying to censor other creators.

  16. Randy Markos says:

    Nice puff piece for these shiesty grifters.

  17. Mike Altano says:

    This is one of the sleaziest scams I have ever seen on youtube. They are pretending to own the rights to reaction videos… what’s next, selling a license for unboxing videos? oh btw, I do own the rights to all of them. Give me a %30 cut of all your ad revenue….

  18. Bret Crutchfield says:

    Exactly what are they licensing again? Reaction videos?

    So, I can make a video of me reacting to something, get a free logo as payment for them making royalties off of content?

    This is absolutely ridiculous. I hope it fails hard.

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