‘Rambo’ TV Series in the Works at Fox

Rambo Remake

Fox is suiting up for a reboot of “Rambo,” ordering a script for a one-hour drama based on the iconic Sylvester Stallone film franchise.

The long-gestating project, which is executive produced by Stallone and Avi Lerner, plans to pay homage to the movies. Titled “Rambo: New Blood,” it will explore the complex relationship between Rambo and his son, J.R., an ex-Navy SEAL.

Jeb Stuart (“The Fugitive,” “Another 48 Hrs.”) penned the script and is also exec producing the project, which hails from Entertainment One in partnership in Millennium Films. EOne TV exec v.p. of global production Carrie Stein is overseeing the project for the studio. Stuart is repped by UTA, Kaplan Perrone and attorney John Meigs.

Deadline suggests that Stallone might reprise his role of the former Green Beret on screen, although sources tell Variety that nothing has officially been decided. This strategy worked well for the CBS adaptation of the Bradley Cooper film “Limitless,” as episodes that featured the Oscar nominee have given the freshman drama ratings boosts. The series got a full-season order in October.

Fox, however, has not been as lucky with film-to-TV adaptations this season. It’s version of Steven Spielberg’s “Minority Report” saw its episode order slashed from 13 to 10 after three under-performing episodes.

Stallone is at work on his fifth “Rambo” movie, titled “Rambo: Last Blood.” He also currently appears as another one of his famous characters, Rocky Balboa, opposite Michael B. Jordan in the Ryan Coolger-directed “Creed.”

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  1. As someone who has grown watching his movies it really pains me to see Stallone not experimenting much.I don’nt know much about how Hollywood works but I have seen Clint Eastwood do some very good movies at an age of 60+ and I wonder are there not much work left for Stallone in Hollywood.Expendables franchise is only about making money by cashing on the nostalgia but it is not a patch on Stallone’s work in his prime.I really want him to write scripts which justify his talent we miss movies like Rocky and want him to do justice to his talent.

  2. IdaWPolk says:

    Yes, Creed is a big hit, but it doesn’t mean you need to apply the “Stallone as mentor” take to every one of your franchises. You do this EVERY TIME you have a hit — your ego is stroked, you assume you are now once again a big MOVE STAR, and you go back into your well and overextend yourself into pointless sequels. (Not before downing roids and spending countless hours in the gym in a futile attempt to once again look like you’re 30, of course!) We did not need an Expendables 2 and 3, nor a Rocky 5 nor a Rambo 4.

    There is a wellspring of Oscar buzz about your role in Creed. It won’t happen this time, the current old guard will never let you into the club, but if you take this opportunity to dive into character roles in quality films then maybe a few years down the line when some of the fogies have retired, the Academy will reward you, and you can retire with dignity as an artist, not an HGH-inflated sequel-stamper.

    There have been mentions of how your work in Creed reminded people of COPLAND, which was a moment that you unfortunately squandered by jumping back into silly action roles. You should have stuck with character roles in some of the many great indie films that were being made back then.

    You can still do that. There is time, Sly, there is time. Don’t listen to your agents; they just want their 10%. Call up Coogler and ask him to refer you to his filmmaker friends and get on those sets and do the work, no matter how scary it may seem now. You will thank me, my friend, I promise.

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  3. Spider Rico says:

    Ugh. As a huge Rambo fan when I was a kid who recently watched the second film again and was blown away by how utterly silly it was, I say let this one rest. Stallone’s last film, “John Rambo,” was actually not bad, and surprisingly, not campy and did not shy away from the shocking ultra-violence that is closer to the realities of warfare. It made Rambo relevant to the modern era, as much as that is possible with such a contrived character, and it put a nice cap on the series and allowed Sly to retire the character with dignity.

    Please don’t sully that with a TV show that will last five episodes, at most.

    Seriously, SLY, as a fan of yours who has followed you from the beginning, PLEASE listen to me:

    Yes, Creed is a big hit, but it doesn’t mean you need to apply the “Stallone as mentor” take to every one of your franchises. You do this EVERY TIME you have a hit — your ego is stroked, you assume you are now once again a big MOVE STAR, and you go back into your well and overextend yourself into pointless sequels. (Not before downing roids and spending countless hours in the gym in a futile attempt to once again look like you’re 30, of course!) We did not need an Expendables 2 and 3, nor a Rocky 5 nor a Rambo 4.

    There is a wellspring of Oscar buzz about your role in Creed. It won’t happen this time, the current old guard will never let you into the club, but if you take this opportunity to dive into character roles in quality films then maybe a few years down the line when some of the fogies have retired, the Academy will reward you, and you can retire with dignity as an artist, not an HGH-inflated sequel-stamper.

    There have been mentions of how your work in Creed reminded people of COPLAND, which was a moment that you unfortunately squandered by jumping back into silly action roles. You should have stuck with character roles in some of the many great indie films that were being made back then.

    You can still do that. There is time, Sly, there is time. Don’t listen to your agents; they just want their 10%. Call up Coogler and ask him to refer you to his filmmaker friends and get on those sets and do the work, no matter how scary it may seem now. You will thank me, my friend, I promise.

  4. The latest, “RAMBO” should be the last because it brought the character “home”. But another film is only about money and Stallone’s search for his last hurrah.

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