Film Review: ‘The Perfect Guy’

'The Perfect Guy' Review: Forgettable B-Movie
Sony

David M. Rosenthal’s Internet-age thriller falls head over heels for cheesy cliches.

Sanaa Lathan is as tough as she is fetching, which is why it’s so disheartening to watch her play a dopey victim for much of “The Perfect Guy,” in which her well-to-do professional is terrorized by a new flame who doesn’t take kindly to being dumped. Boasting a screenplay by Tyger Williams that never fails to telegraph its every move, David M. Rosenthal’s film is a cheap “Fatal Attraction” knockoff, complete with a subplot involving the potentially dire fate of Lathan’s beloved pet. While no bunnies wind up being boiled, the rest of this second-rate genre effort is a strictly by-the-books affair. Despite an appealing trio of leads, it seems likely to entice only those with an unquenchable thirst for thriller cliches.

Leah (Lathan) is a successful California lobbyist whose relationship with Dave (Morris Chestnut) falls apart due to his disinterest in committing to the type of marriage-with-children future that she craves. No sooner has she dropped Dave than Leah is swept off her feet by Carter (Michael Ealy), a sexy suitor who first meets her at a coffee shop and, following another chance encounter that ends with her literally swooning over his kisses, reveals himself to be everything – devoted, passionate, respectful and interested in starting a family – that Leah wants in a partner. In case that wasn’t immediately clear from Ealy’s perpetually humble-and-sweet routine (not to mention the film’s title), Leah’s friend Alicia (Rutina Wesley) bluntly states, “He might be the perfect guy!” — thereby cementing the filmmakers’ dedication to making everything about their story as leadenly obvious as possible.

After a weekend at her parents’ house, during which Leah’s new beau wins over her dad (Charles S. Dutton) with front-row San Francisco Giants tickets, Carter loses his cool at a gas station and viciously beats a man he mistakenly thinks is hitting on Leah. That violent outburst so rightfully frightens Leah that it ends their relationship, and Carter takes the development quite badly. As an IT expert with all sorts of stalker-ish skills involving security systems and spy cameras, Carter quickly becomes a menacing thorn in Leah’s side, especially once she reconciles with Dave. His attempts to make Carter stay away from Leah via public threats are as useless as the detectives looking into Carter’s behavior, and the restraining order Leah eventually gets against him.

As Ealy’s conduct tips over into lunatic territory, director Rosenthal recasts him as not only an unhinged ex, but a psychotic in a distinctly horror-movie mold. Standing in a doorway looking down on one of his victims, Carter assumes a stoic Michael Myers pose. Later, his surreptitious appearance outside Leah’s shower — in which she’s canoodling with Dave — turns him into a Norman Bates-ish madman. Meanwhile, Dave is rendered as such a trivial would-be protector that his powerlessness practically oozes off the screen (this despite obligatory shots of a shirtless Chestnut’s buff body), and Leah is forced to assume the role of helpless prey, incapable of enlisting the help she needs, or attaining the necessary strength herself, to stop her former boyfriend from destroying her personal and professional lives.

Eventually, Williams’ script has Leah turn the tables on her tormentor, thereby finally allowing Lathan to exhibit the gritty ferocity — as demonstrated in films including “Blade” and “AVP: Alien vs. Predator” — that makes the accomplished actress more than just a pretty face. Unfortunately, it’s far too little too late to salvage “The Perfect Guy” from its own dull suspense. It may be awash in Internet-age fears about surveillance and identity, but at heart, it’s little more than a retrograde B-movie.

Film Review: 'The Perfect Guy'

Reviewed at AMC Loews Port Chester 14, Port Chester, New York, Sept. 11, 2015. MPAA Rating: PG-13. Running time: 100 MIN.

Production

A Sony Pictures Entertainment release of a Screen Gems presentation of a Rocklin/Faust production. Produced by Tommy Oliver, Wendy Rhoads, Nicole Rocklin, Darryl Taja. Executive producer, Michael Ealy, Sanaa Lathan, Glenn S. Gainor. Co-producer, Valerie Bleth Sharp.

Crew

Directed by David M. Rosenthal. Screenplay, Tyger Williams. Camera (color, widescreen, HD), Peter Simonite; editor, Joan Sobel; music, Dave Fleming, Atli Orvarsson; music editor, Brian Richards; production designer, William Arnold; art director, Dennis Bradford; set decorator, Lisa Clark; costume designer, Annie Bloom; sound, Steven Morrow; supervising sound editor, Kami Asgar; re-recording mixers, Tony Lamberti, Mark Paterson; visual effects supervisor, Erick Geisler; visual effects, Alden Anderson, Piotr Bednarczyk; stunt coordinator, Lance Gilbert; assistant director, Steve Danton; second unit director, Janell M. Sammelman; casting, Venus Kanani, Mary Vernieu.

With

Sanaa Lathan, Michael Ealy, Morris Chestnut, L. Scott Caldwell, Charles S. Dutton, John Getz, Tess Harper, Kathryn Morris, Rutina Wesley.

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  1. Terri says:

    Someone didn’t do there research. Lathan had a very small role in Blade. She played Snipes young mother in a flashback. Your confusing Lathan with NBushe Wright who was the female lead badass in the film.
    The two don’t even look alike.

    Overall the review of the first film is spot on, which is shame. Sanaa is a better quality actress than this crappy knockoff.

  2. Ecotton says:

    Would be better off watching Ealy in The Following. Although the show was cancelled, this past season stands alone even if you didn’t watch the Fox series from the beginning, and Ealy shows with creepy precision how he can transform from hazel- eyed heartthrob to cold blooded killer (ironically with similar tech savvy skills). And – surprise – he’s given more of a backstory than just the convenient bi-polar disorder which makes his twisted actions in The Following have more motivation than they did in The Perfect Guy. Not a wasted two hours…but a very predictable thriller, unfortunately.

  3. gracieruth says:

    A knockoff of Reese Witherspoon and Mark Wahlberg’s 1996 film, FEAR. FEAR was much more intense, suspenseful and had a plot. Ealy did not convince me in this villian role. Movie didn’t make sense. Very disappointed in Lathaan and Ealy.

    • LVB says:

      I think gracieruth did not see the same movie I did. It was awesome. Michael Ealy was very convincing as the stalker/sociopath/the perfect guy. It was even more sinister than his role in the tv show ‘The Following”. I will be definitely seeing this one again.

  4. Thomasina says:

    Thumbs up to this movie. Sanaa glad you are telling this story. I was in several situations like this. Hey, girls it’s a jungle out there. Be careful.

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