Breaking Bad

Netflix took home the International Award for “Breaking Bad” at the BAFTA Television Awards on Sunday.

Crime drama “Broadchurch” was recognized in three categories: Olivia Colman won the BAFTA for leading actress for her performance as Ellie Miller, whilst co-star David Bradley received his first BAFTA for supporting actor. Colman’s win takes her career tally to three; she has now won a BAFTA in each of the performance categories. The program also won a BAFTA in the highly competitive drama series category.

“The IT Crowd” was rewarded in both comedy performance categories, with Richard Ayoade and Katherine Parkinson winning their first BAFTAs for male and female performance in a comedy program respectively.

The BAFTA for situation comedy went to “Him & Her: The Wedding,” the first of two awards won by BBC Three.

The BAFTA for leading actor went to first-time nominee Sean Harris for his performance as Stephen Morton in “Southcliffe,” the drama about a small town’s shootings. Sarah Lancashire, another first-time BAFTA winner, took home the award for supporting actress, her second nomination in as many years for her performance in BBC One’s popular drama, “Last Tango in Halifax.”

Ant and Dec, one of the U.K.’s most popular double-acts, fended off stiff competition from Charlie Brooker, Sarah Millican and ceremony host Graham Norton to take home the BAFTA in the entertainment performance category for “Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway,” which also won the entertainment program category.

The award for soap and continuing drama returned to Weatherfield as “Coronation Street” added a 10th BAFTA to its collection.

The award for miniseries went to BBC Three hit “In the Flesh,” written by BAFTA “Breakthrough Brit,” and television craft award-winner Dominic Mitchell. The BAFTA for single drama was won by domestic terrorism thriller “Complicit.”

Channel 4 fared well in factual: “Bedlam” won for factual series; “The Murder Trial,” which saw cameras placed inside a British court for the entirety of a trial, won for single documentary; and “Syria: Across the Lines” (“Dispatches”) received the BAFTA for current affairs, the 10th BAFTA (across television and television craft) for a “Dispatches” film.

“Gogglebox,” in its first series, was successful in the reality and constructed factual category.

Bringing ITV’s tally to eight BAFTAs, “Long Lost Family” won in features and “ITV News at Ten: Woolwich Attacks” in news coverage.

Sky achieved success across a range of programming with its three nominations converting to wins in factual, sport and comedy: “David Attenborough’s Natural History Museum Alive 3D” received the BAFTA for specialist factual; “The Ashes 2013 – 1st Test, Day 5” took home the award for sport and live event; and “A League of Their Own” won the BAFTA for comedy and comedy entertainment program.

The Radio Times Audience Award, the only award voted for by the public, was won by “Doctor Who: The Day of the Doctor,” beating “Breaking Bad,” “Broadchurch,” “Educating Yorkshire,” “Gogglebox” and “The Great British Bake Off.”

The special award was presented to Cilla Black, the entertainer, actress and singer, for her 50-year contribution to British television entertainment.

The Fellowship, the highest accolade the academy bestows, was presented to actress Julie Walters in recognition of an exceptional contribution to television over 30 years and her ground-breaking work across a range of genres, from serious drama to comedy.

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