Stockholm Movie

Cult Spanish feature debut will also receive U.S. distribution

MADRID – Paul Hudson’s L.A.-based Outsider Pictures has acquired worldwide sales to one of Spain’s most talked-up debuts, Rodrigo Sorogoyen’s “Stockholm,” which marks out its director as a singular talent to track.

Achieving cult status in Spain, it is also an eloquent example of the creative liberties earned by totally private-sector funding in Europe.

Outsider Pictures will open “Siockholm” theatrically in the U.-S, then bow it on its digital streaming site, Todo Cine Latino (tclonline.com), unless it receives an offer it can’t refuse from a fellow U.S. distributor, Hudson said.

It will screen “Stockholm” to international distributors at May’s Cannes Festival.

Also singular in its financing, but apparently familiar in its dramatic set-up, at least in its opening stretches until it takes its first of multiple turns, including a contrasting second half, the psychological thriller turns on a young guy (Javier Pereira) who goes up to a girl (Aura Garrido) at a night club and says he’s in love with her.

As his opening gambit plays out over one single night and the following morning, when the film initiates an effective second part, with the couple walking the streets of late-night Madrid, then going back to his place, it will prove to have grave consequences.

“’Stockholm’ takes you on a journey that is at once familiar and then very unexpected, and the chemistry between the two leads is exceptional… I haven’t seen anything like this in quite a while,” said Hudson.

Written by Sorogoyen and Isabel Pena, and shot over 15 days – though Sorogoyen insists he didn’t need much more time – won best director and actress at Spain’s Malaga Festival – Garrido’s second Malaga win in three years – “Stockholm” won Pereira a Goya this February as best breakthrough actor. It also won Garrido the CEC Awards and toped the Spanish film-writers Feroz Awards as best drama.

Financed by hundreds of micro-investors, it was the first crowd-funded film in Spain to win a Goya.

“Nowadays in Spain it is really difficult to produce any film project, public grants are disappearing and there isn’t a tradition of private investment in film production. So filmmakers have to explore new ways of producing,” said producer Borja Soler at Caballo Films, a label he shares with Sorogoyen and further partners.

“’Stockholm’ was financed mixing crowd-funding with small private investments. There were no public grants, or bank credits, or big production company associations or a TV station involved in the film.  It was a big undertaking, but it was the only way to do the film we wanted, with total freedom and control of what we were doing,” he added.

Recognised as one of the finest Spanish actresses of her generation, Having worked with some of Spain’s other leading young directors – Jonas Trueba in “The Wishful Thinkers,” Jorge Sanchez-Cabezudo in pay TV series “Crematorium,” Oriol Paulo in “The Body” – Garrido was featured in Variety as a star to watch; Sorogoyen has been chosen as one of Variety’s 10 talents to track in its Cannes 2014 Spanish Cinema Spotlight.

Emilio Mayorga contributed to this article

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