Top 20 Most Pirated Movies of 2014 Led by ‘Wolf of Wall Street,’ ‘Frozen,’ ‘Gravity’

wolf of wall street
Courtesy of Paramount

The Wolf of Wall Street,” starring Leonardo DiCaprio, and Disney’s animated smash “Frozen” were the two most-pirated movies for the year — with each title downloaded about 30 million times by torrent users worldwide in 2014.

Alfonso Cuarón’s space epic “Gravity” followed with 29.4 million downloads by pirates, then Warner Bros.’ “The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug” (27.6 million) and Marvel’s “Thor: The Dark World” (25.7 million), according to piracy-tracking firm Excipio. The firm compiled the data for the period between Jan. 1 and Dec. 23, 2014.

Among the top 20 most-pirated titles, superhero, sci-fi, fantasy and action movies were well represented, as were Oscar-nominated films (“Wolf of Wall Street,” “Gravity,” “12 Years a Slave,” “American Hustle”).

One issue in tracking the most-pirated films of the year was that MGM’s 2014 “RoboCop” reboot has the same name as the original 1987 version. Downloads of the two movies combined to reach nearly 30 million, according to Excipio; however, it’s not clear how many of those the most recent “RoboCop” accounted for.

As with “RoboCop,” there was another potential duplicate title in the data set: In addition to “The Legend of Hercules” was the 2014 “Hercules” starring Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson (released in July 2014). However, Excipio confirmed the latter movie was not as popular on torrent sites even though it raked in more than “Legend of Hercules” at the box office.

Here is the full list of top 20 pirated movies of the year ranked by number of downloads (along with studio and original theatrical release date):

1. “The Wolf of Wall Street”: 30.035 million (Paramount, Dec. 25, 2013)
2. “Frozen”: 29.919 million (Disney, Nov. 27, 2013)
3. “RoboCop”*: 29.879 million (MGM, Feb. 12, 2014; and Orion, July 17, 1987)
4. “Gravity”: 29.357 million (Warner Bros., Oct. 4, 2013)
5. “The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug”: 27.627 million (Warner Bros., Dec. 13, 2013)
6. “Thor: The Dark World”: 25.749 million (Disney/Marvel, Nov. 8, 2013)
7. “Captain America: The Winter Soldier”: 25.628 million (Disney/Marvel, April 4, 2014)
8. “The Legend of Hercules”: 25.137 million (Summit, Jan. 10, 2014)
9. “X-Men: Days of Future Past”: 24.380 million (20th Century Fox, May 23, 2014)
10. “12 Years a Slave”: 23.653 million (Fox Searchlight, Oct. 18, 2013)
11. “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire”: 23.543 million (Lionsgate, Nov. 22, 2013)
12. “American Hustle”: 23.143 million (Sony/Columbia, Dec. 13, 2013)
13. “300: Rise of an Empire”: 23.096 million (Warner Bros., March 7, 2014)
14. “Transformers: Age of Extinction”: 21.65 million (Paramount, June 27, 2014)
15. “Godzilla”: 20.956 million (Warner Bros., May 16, 2014)
16. “Noah”: 20.334 million (Paramount, March 28, 2014)
17. “Divergent”: 20.312 million (Lionsgate, March 21, 2014)
18. “Edge of Tomorrow”: 20.299 million (Warner Bros., June 6, 2014)
19. “Captain Phillips”: 19.817 million (Sony/Columbia, Oct. 11, 2013)
20. “Lone Survivor”: 19.130 million (Universal, Dec. 25, 2013)

* Combines data for both 1987 and 2014 versions.
Source: Excipio

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  1. If you look these titles up at BoxOfficeMojo.com each one save four recouped its ENTIRE budget with Domestic sales. The movie industry isn’t hurting. They just like to pretend they are. One movie out of the four “could” have recouped its money if people didn’t pirate. But that’s not to say that the same people who pirate would go buy the movie anyway. Check out my report with some detailed information. Thanks Variety, I used your information for my article.

  2. Judith Mason says:

    I did not download any pirated videos EVER! That is part of this county’s problem…people want something for nothing. How would anyone like it if someone stole their paycheck. Well, this kind of download is the same thing. Think about it.

  3. elisabettaly says:

    Reblogged this on Filmologìe of monsters and little princesses and commented:
    1. “The Wolf of Wall Street”: 30.035 million (Paramount, Dec. 25, 2013)
    2. “Frozen”: 29.919 million (Disney, Nov. 27, 2013)
    3. “RoboCop”*: 29.879 million (MGM, Feb. 12, 2014; and Orion, July 17, 1987)
    4. “Gravity”: 29.357 million (Warner Bros., Oct. 4, 2013)
    5. “The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug”: 27.627 million (Warner Bros., Dec. 13, 2013)
    6. “Thor: The Dark World”: 25.749 million (Disney/Marvel, Nov. 8, 2013)
    7. “Captain America: The Winter Soldier”: 25.628 million (Disney/Marvel, April 4, 2014)
    8. “The Legend of Hercules”: 25.137 million (Summit, Jan. 10, 2014)
    9. “X-Men: Days of Future Past”: 24.380 million (20th Century Fox, May 23, 2014)
    10. “12 Years a Slave”: 23.653 million (Fox Searchlight, Oct. 18, 2013)
    11. “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire”: 23.543 million (Lionsgate, Nov. 22, 2013)
    12. “American Hustle”: 23.143 million (Sony/Columbia, Dec. 13, 2013)
    13. “300: Rise of an Empire”: 23.096 million (Warner Bros., March 7, 2014)
    14. “Transformers: Age of Extinction”: 21.65 million (Paramount, June 27, 2014)
    15. “Godzilla”: 20.956 million (Warner Bros., May 16, 2014)
    16. “Noah”: 20.334 million (Paramount, March 28, 2014)
    17. “Divergent”: 20.312 million (Lionsgate, March 21, 2014)
    18. “Edge of Tomorrow”: 20.299 million (Warner Bros., June 6, 2014)
    19. “Captain Phillips”: 19.817 million (Sony/Columbia, Oct. 11, 2013)
    20. “Lone Survivor”: 19.130 million (Universal, Dec. 25, 2013)

  4. weaponsofid says:

    This article should be re-titled to state “Paramount, Disney and WB lose millions due to stubbornness.” Just think of the millions of dollars of lost revenue because dinosaur companies refuse to acknowledge the interest that MILLIONS of people have in downloading/viewing digital copies instead of the old fashioned means to distribute (theaters and DVDs/Blurays). Wake up! “The Interview” – thanks in part to the controversy that stirred to give it so much free press – made $15 million in just 4 days. Just imagine how much more they would have made if they weren’t selling/renting at $6/$15 respectively. Offer it for $1 like redbox or a flat monthly rate like Netflix and everyone can be happy.

    Or keep fighting the tide and lose.

  5. eh says:

    that is very sad

  6. AaronH says:

    Back when I was a kid pirating movies and games, there is no way in the world I ever would have bought any of them. I highly doubt that but a small percentage of these downloads would translate into sales if pirating were not possible. Now that I have a career, there is no way I would bother trying to pirate – not that I have any qualms against it.. it is just not worth the time/effort. Easier just to purchase and have it in good quality on a pretty disk that can go on the shelf by the dvd player – not that I would actually watch any of this new, formulaic, special effects driven crap anyway – I prefer older movies that actually have intelligent content. I would still prefer to purchase a professionally written disk over downloading even if the content were not copyrighted and legally available for free. I’d rather pay someone else to do the downloading and make a nice disk in a package for me.

  7. fto says:

    Oscar should go to the most downloads.

  8. Duder NME says:

    Does Excipio do this as a neener neener to all film studios, or is it hired by them to track the fame/infamy of such films? I don’t understand why studios would want to see which films they lost money on, and then do nothing about it. Lists like this confuse and frighten and arouse me.

  9. Jack says:

    Why the hell is this even NEWS?! Seriously.. this what people should be asking. What movie studios are paying this schmuck to report this b.s.? There is always an AGENDA! It’s called propaganda, brought to you by: insert rich guy name here! The end goal in this case is to control, censor and destroy the last area of freedom- The internet.

  10. nerdrage says:

    No Guardians of the Galaxy? And why would anyone bother to pirate Gravity, considering that it loses so much of its impact when not seen in a movie theater. Something like 12 Years a Slave makes the transition so much better.

  11. Nina says:

    You have to wonder how the figures for numbers of downloads was arrived at.

  12. niki says:

    film answer prints playing on 35mm projectors will have to come back and save the studios hundreds of millions…

  13. Daniel says:

    One day, the Supreme court, in their self-righteous ignorance will see that there is a world demand too high to disallow the downloading of films in poorer economic áreas. Not just in the third-world. Film festival reporters ascend their high horses about the bravery and determination of some filmmakers to produce their work, which is accepted as much as those made with high-end funding. They should not be deprived of observing new worlds and ideas that only travel or literature in a foreign language could otherwise provide. Even if it´s the latest shit from Scorcese.

    • nerdrage says:

      Pirates are not people living in mud huts. They are people who have enough money to afford a computer, laptop, tablet or smartphone, internet access and electricity. They just want something for nothing.

      • M. Strain Jr. says:

        I purchased my computer bit by bit a couple years ago when I was working a job. Since then, I’ve been laid off and living with my dad. I now make no income, so my dad’s paying for my housing, food, and internet. So I can’t spend what little savings I have on these movies. Whether I pirate them or don’t see them at all, no one’s losing any money off me.

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