Cameron-Pace Group, Dolby and Philips Strike 3D Alliance

James Cameron Forms 3D Alliance With

Tech trio unite to support glasses-free 3D TV

LAS VEGAS — 3D TV may not be the hot topic it was a couple of years ago, but James Cameron and his company remain no less determined to advance the case for stereoscopic on the smallscreen.

Today at the NAB Show Cameron’s 3D technology company Cameron-Pace Group, Dolby Laboratories and Royal Philips Electronics announced they have pacted to support 3D content in general and glasses-free 3D TV in particular.

Under the agreement, CPG will integrate Dolby 3D — Dolby’s suite of autostereo TV technologies — into its future content and collaborate on its use. The goal is to create smart content that adjusts the 3D settings automatically.

See Also: Red Camera Acquires 2D Gear from 3ality Technica

Giles Baker, senior VP, broadcast business group, Dolby Laboratories, told Variety the alliance seeks to bring high-quality 3D viewing, without glasses, to the home. “3D is not really going to be successful as a mainstream viewing medium for consumers until it’s as easy as sitting down and watching the content,” said Baker.
“In order to deliver that best experience, you really need to embed a deep understanding of how the content was created into the 3D content,” he said. The Cameron Pace Group will embed information on how the content was created into all content created with a CPG workflow, so that information is available when content is played back on a Dolby 3D device.
CPG co-chair Vince Pace said Dolby’s business experience and acumen made them the right partner for awakening consumer interest in 3D TV. “The model for 3D success is from companies that know what they’re doing, know the combination of quality and technology. So Dolby was a perfect fit for CPG.”
Steve Schklair, head of CPG’s rival 3ality Technica, told Variety Monday that 3D live broadcasting had stalled in part because of the lack of a strong business model in the U.S. Pace took issue with Schklair as he discussed this new alliance.
“People will see entertainment as they experience everyday life and CPG will take the business steps to make that happen,” said Pace. “That was done in the theatrical world, when Jim (Cameron) committed to making a film in 3D when digital cameras, digital cinemas, were all in their infancy. If you look at the broadcast model, to describe it as in its infancy is correct. But we see that as an opportunity for us. That’s the kind of market we like to play in.”

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  1. James Krisvoy says:

    In order to make this viable, the monitor willfirst of all have to be stereo-accurate. Anything short of that will be a cheat and won’t warrant a large investment in these systems. That said, that accurate 3D image will have to be viewable from anywhere in a room to be comfortable. There is at least one autostereo technology in development right now that will be stereo-accurate, but limited in viewing range and it is expected to be more approprate for specialized applications.

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