Anderson Cooper Honored, Madonna Takes on Scouts at GLAAD

Anderson Cooper and Madonna at the

“Jersey Shore” cast members Jenni ‘J-Woww’ Farley, Vinny Guadagnino and Nicole “Snooki” Polizzi were out in full force March 16 for the GLAAD Media Awards. Polizzi said she wanted to attend and show her support because “I think you all are fucking awesome.”

GLAAD prexy Herndon Graddick told the crowd at the New York Marriott Marquis, “The new GLAAD is making transgender equality a priority.”

The big moment, of course, was reserved for honoree Anderson Cooper and presenter Madonna, who appeared on stage wearing a Boy Scout uniform.

“I wanted to be a Boy Scout, but they wouldn’t let me join,” she explained. “I think that’s fucked up. I can build a fire. I know how to pitch a tent. I have a very good sense of direction. Most importantly, I know how to scout for boys.”

Then Madonna told everybody to relax and sit down from their standing ovation because she “had a few axes to grind. I don’t know about you, but I can’t take this shit anymore!”

Madonna then copped a feel while handing over the Vito Russo Award to her good friend.

“I have lipstick from Madonna on me,” said Cooper, wiping his lips. “I’ve had so many blessings in my life and being gay is certainly the greatest blessing.”

Also honored was Brett Ratner, who referenced his 2011 Oscar brouhaha in his speech, saying, “I’m getting to show the world what I really am, which is an ally to the LGBT community.”

The night ended with Wilson Cruz, who also came on stage wearing a Boy Scout outfit. “Oh, so you thought Madge was the only one who wears a uniform?” he asked. “I grew up in the 80s. Madge taught me how to wear a suit.”

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  1. Bike Guy says:

    I am grateful to Madonna, Bill Gates, Carly Rae, Train, and all the others for standing up to discrimination. It is through such actions that change happens. I hope and expect that BSA will make the right decision in May and end the ban. If not they risk continuing their trajectory towards becoming the Boy Scouts of Conservative Christians rather than the Boy Scouts of America. Once the ban is lifted it will be a total non-issue and the fears of the right-wing will not materialize at all, just as happened with Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.

    In Canada other civilized Scouting nations, the Scout program has remained non-sectarian as envisioned by its British founder, Baden Powell. They do not exclude gay men and gay teens in Canada, France, Mexico, Australia, the UK (where Scouting was founded), or elsewhere. Only in the USA with our disproportionate population of Christian fundamentalists has this been a problem. The ban was implemented in 1992 mainly under Mormon pressure.

    I quote Scouting’s founder, Lord Baden Powell:
    “Buddha has said: ‘There is only one way of driving out Hate in the world and that is by bringing in 
Love.’ Scouting’s aim is to produce healthy, happy, helpful citizens, of both sexes, to eradicate the prevailing narrow self interest, personal, political, SECTARIAN [emphasis mine] and national, and to substitute for it a broader spirit of self-sacrifice and service in the cause of humanity.”

    I look forward to rejoining the Scouts after the ban ends. I hope the religious conservatives will remain in the Scouts, knowing that when we are out chopping wood or putting up a tent in the rain, our religious differences or sexual orientations matter less than our ability to work together, as Americans, as people.

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