'Kinky Boots' Tops $1 Million, 'Breakfast'

Broadway musical joins millionaires' club while 'Breakfast at Tiffany's' calls it quits

It was good news and bad news on Broadway last week, with the upbeat headline centered on “Kinky Boots,” which for the first time joined fellow spring openers “Lucky Guy” and “Cinderella” in the millionaires’ club.

On the bad news front, spring break was clearly over, with drops of varying sizes at the majority of titles on the boards including “Breakfast at Tiffany’s,” which posted a closing notice for April 21 after pulling in just $300,346 for the seven days.

“Kinky Boots” ($1,026,793) had been logging strong sales for weeks, but it’s only now that the show, with largely positive reviews to fuel it and the majority of press comps out of the way, could climb up the ladder to top the $1 million mark.

The musical brushed past “Cinderella” ($1,007,275), down 19% but still plenty robust, and “Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark” (sliding 28% to $1,010,086) to come in behind Tom Hanks-powered “Lucky Guy” ($1,400,471, its best tally so far).

“Motown” ($959,091), meanwhile, dropped below $1 million for the first time, but that’s attributable to a comp-heavy frame that included press previews and its April 14 opening night. Expect sales to bounce right back up in the coming seshes.

“Matilda” ($745,923) also was down in its opening week. Given the raves the tuner earned in the wake of its April 11 bow, expect B.O. at that one also to regain steam quickly.

Meanwhile, Bette Midler topliner “I’ll Eat You Last” ($564,333 for six previews) continued to do encouraging biz, with both sales and attendance coming in at more than 95% of capacity, while Alec Baldwin starrer “Orphans” ($569,401) also logged solid numbers. Alan Cumming vehicle “Macbeth” ($444,016 for six) looked healthy too, especially considering the production is essentially a one-man show.

“Jekyll and Hyde” ($451,377) posted only modest sales in its first full week of eight previews, while Fiona Shaw topliner “The Testament of Mary” ($184,561 for seven) has yet  to turn heads.

But with fewer spring-break tourists in town, sales momentum didn’t pick up for most shows on the boards. Not even closing tuner “Hands on a Hardbody” ($219,352) could get a spike of last-minute sales before it shuttered April 13.

The overall Broadway attendance of 252,058 was actually down only slightly from the prior frame, but as the slip in the Street-wide average ticket price (from $101.19 to $91.82) makes clear, overall demand was lower. Total box office cume slipped $2.75 million to $23.1 million for 32 shows.

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