Zach Braff Hits $2 Million Kickstarter Goal in 4 Days

zach braff

Production draws backing from over 28,000

Zach Braff has reached his $2 million goal in the first four days of his Kickstarter campaign to raise funds from fans for the drama “Wish I Was Here.”

The campaign crossed the $2 million mark shortly before noon Saturday, 26 days before its closing date, with backing from over 28,000 fans.

The project received 4,654 donations of $10 with the promise of a production diary; 3,848 pledges at $20 each to receive the soundtrack and playlist; 3,636 donations at $30 each for a “backers screening”; 6,251 at $40 for a “Wish I Was Here” T-shirt; and 2,115 at $60 for three art prints.

The campaign also raised significant coin via $100 donations for advance screenings with a Q-and-A with Braff including 104 for a screening in Toronto, 449 in Los Angeles, 630 in London, 399 in Chicago and 126 in San Francisco. The campaign also sold screenings for two at $200 each.

Other higher priced items included 432 backers at $150 for a signed copy of the “Garden State” DVD; 478 pledges at $175 for signed “Wish I Was Here” posters and 400 backers who promised $200 each to get their name into the film under a “writing on the wall” pledge.

“I’ll put your name in the movie,” Braff explained. “My character in the film encounters a wall covered in graffiti each morning. Give me a name for our set designers to paint on the wall. I can’t guarantee every name will be legible in the final cut. But, you will be able to find your name in high rez images of the wall that I’ll send out in the backer update. Your support will forever be a part of the history of how this movie got made, and I will show it.”

Braff plans to star and direct from a screenplay he co-wrote with his brother Adam. Stacey Sher and Michael Shamberg will produce via their Double Feature Films.

For “Wish I Was Here,” Braff will portray a struggling actor, husband and father trying to find his identity and purpose at age 35. He winds up trying to home school his two children when his father can no longer afford to pay for private education and the only available public school is on its last legs.

Producers plan  to shoot the film in Los Angeles in the summer.

Braff cited the success of last month’s “Veronica Mars” campaign, which raised a record $5.7 million on Kickstarter, as a reason for going ahead with his own campaign.

I was about to sign a typical financing deal to get the money to make ‘Wish I Was Here,’ my follow up to ‘Garden State,'” he said on the campaign page. ” It would have involved making a lot of sacrifices I think would have ultimately hurt the film. I’ve been a backer for several projects on Kickstarter and thought the concept was fascinating and revolutionary for artists and innovators of all kinds. But I didn’t imagine it could work on larger-scale projects. I was wrong.”

Braff wrote, directed and starred in 2004′s “Garden State.” He was most recently seen in Sam Raimi’s “Oz the Great and Powerful.”

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  1. Sergey Avanesyan says:

    Respect for everyone who is involved in this project. It’s time to get changes. Quality of movie can’t goes more lower in chase for profit.

  2. MARK WITHERS says:

    Okay, so the first rule of film producing is ‘never use your own money’, but if a filmmaker truly believes in their own project they should be prepared to put their money where their mouth is.
    I too am an independent filmmaker desperately trying to raise funds for my 4th feature film ‘Bonobo’ (after a backer pulled out and we go into production on June 5th) so we set up a Kickstarter campaign for which I’ve already shaved my hair off as publicity and agreed to get a Kickstarter tattoo if we hit our goal of $17,000 (this is to re-top up our small budget)….yet it is so slow!
    Unlike Mr Braff I’m not ‘known’ and I certainly don’t have the kind of money he A)earns or B)has access to, yet I’m currently BANK ROLLING THE PRODUCTION MYSELF at huge financial risk (if and until we find another investor) so I feel that if a well known (and financially well-off) individual is as passionate about their film as I am mine they should be prepared to personally ‘put their money where their mouth is!’
    Because just like the Hollywood blockbusters this pushes aside the smaller indies, leaving them lagging behind in their shadow, barely noticed.

  3. S.Bergmark says:

    I think Kickstarter is an innovative way to fund projects, and the “uneducated public” DOES get a return on their investment – the swag is already identified in this article. It is absolutely no different than sending money in to a PBS campaign. Instead of calling it a donation it’s a way for the average person to “invest”, or be a part of a project like this. That’s more than standard investors can expect in a conventional IPO. Millionaires generate the possibility of income for others because they are fortunate enough to be able to fund their own time – in this case to write the story and find promoters among other things you aren’t thinking about. What have you done to generate work for others with your income? One more thing: Who is to say whether the investor is uneducated? Yes, the project could flop for other reasons, and maybe you don’t get your name on a wall in a broad circulation of the film. How many educated repeat investors lose money on projects that seemed to all to be all sewn up in concept? So many variables are unpredictable in every endeavor which can affect the outcome. Mr. Braff appears to be more transparent with this offer than most in a conventional project funding. I applaud his efforts, past and future.

  4. J says:

    It’s sad when millionaires beg for millions from the uneducated public to donate to a project with no rights or potential return on net profits. It’s unfair and misleading.

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