Stephen King Calls Twilight ‘tweenager porn,’ Talks ‘The Shining’ Sequel

Stephen King - Under the Dome

In promotion for his new “The Shiningsequel “Doctor Sleep,” Stephen King has taken to commenting on some of today’s most popular book series. For those wondering, he’s not a Twihard.

In a recent (and rare) interview, he admitted to reading “Twilight” but wasn’t a fan.

“I agree with Abra’s teacher friend (in ‘Doctor Sleep’) who calls ‘Twilight’ and books like it tweenager porn,” King said. “They’re really not about vampires and werewolves. They’re about how the love of a girl can turn a bad boy good.”

He also wasn’t crazy about “The Hunger Games,” which is seeing its second movie premiere on Nov. 22.

“I read ‘The Hunger Games’ and didn’t feel an urge to go on,” he told the Guardian.  “It’s not unlike ‘The Running Man,’ which is about a game where people are actually killed and people are watching: a satire on reality TV. ”

“The Running Man” is King’s 1982 book that inspired a 1987 movie starring Arnold Schwarzenegger. He was relatively easier on E.L. James’ much-buzzed-about BDSM series “Fifty Shades of Grey.”

“They call it mommy porn, but it’s not really mommy porn. It is highly charged, sexually driven fiction for women who are, say, between 18 and 25. But a golden age of horror? I wouldn’t say it is.”

King’s new book “Doctor Sleep” centers on Danny Torrance, the young psychic from the original, in his adulthood. His mother, Wendy, is dead, and he’s haunted by the memory of his alcoholic father, Jack, who was played by Jack Nicholson in the movie adaptation that King openly disliked.

The story of Jack hits close to home for King, as he was formerly an alcoholic but has been sober since an intervention in the ’80s.

“The only thing is to write the truth,” he said. “To write what you know about any particular situation. And I never say to anybody, ‘This is all from my experience in AA,’ because you don’t say that.”

“Doctor Sleep” arrives on bookshelves Tuesday.

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  1. Osiris Espino says:

    @Sociologist
    I have read all three novels as well. I don’t believe in propagating poor grammar, and overall poor composition among our younger, female generation. It’s already bad enough society views women as idiots, especially those that use feminism to excuse their incompetence. We shouldn’t enable it. We come this far to prove we are equal. It’s no means in excusing a poor author on the simple basis that she is female. Much less that she happens to be “bashed” by respected author that just happens to be male.

    Stephan King is merely critiquing based on the books, and explains why they are so popular. You, on the other hand, are bashing on his critique simply because he is a male author. May I also enlighten you to the fact that he lives in a world where it’s all about critics, and ratings. Books, in that sense, are no different than movies, music, or television. You must also understand that as an older author, King lived in a time where the standards for publishing a book were far higher and the critics much harsher. The other three novels, by the marvel of modern technology, were “published independently”, one specifically was a “fan-fiction” before finally being picked up by a major established publisher. In other words, they were simply BLOGGED and someone saw the ruckus and realized it was an easy and big buck for their wallet. They didn’t get picked up for their talent, only for their market value. The same way the pool noodle was a splendidly stupid idea that made millions.

    I’m sorry that your little fanatical heart was crushed, but your opinion is no more important than a mechanic’s were I to ask him what to do concerning my toothache.

    May I suggest reading Anne Rice novels? Since we are on the subject of female authors and a female audience. She also fits the genres and themes written.

  2. Sociologist says:

    I have read all three novels and it saddens me that he bashes these female writers. Two of the books also target a young adult (and mainly female) audience–Steven King is none of these. I do not believe any of these writers see their books as high literature, but if they can get young women to read more–all the power to them. And I’m sorry, Mr. King, you are no literary genius yourself.

  3. I Do Not Compute says:

    Not particularly a fan of TWILIGHT or HUNGER GAMES, but without a doubt King is generating recycled, self-derivative, nonsensical tripe and has been for years.

    • doodlez1996 says:

      Though I happen to agree with your opinion of Twilight and the Hunger Games. I do not for one agree to you calling his work tripe. Stephen King has been writing since he was i high school. He has tried his hand at other things but they do not turn out as well. I myself have read Twilight and I only got three chapters through the Hunger games before I wanted to vomit. Honestly at least Stephen King tries and doesn’t write that smutty rubbish.

  4. Tye says:

    Stephen King writes in a very specific genre himself and though I concur on his evaluation of the Twilight nonsense, he really isn’t one to throw his weight around on other writers skills in areas he apparently has no concept of. Sex sells, and simply because he cannot write about it does not make it any less of an art form in itself.

  5. George says:

    Sounds like someone was really shooting for a sound byte. Desperate for attention Mr. King? Feeling unloved?

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