Mark Gordon Producing Fourth ‘Narnia’ Movie

'Chronicles of Narnia': Mark Gordon Producing

'Narnia' films have already grossed $1.6 billion

Mark Gordon has come on board to produce a fourth “The Chronicles of Narnia” movie.

Gordon has reached a deal with the C.S. Lewis Co. to jointly develop and produce “The Chronicles of Narnia: The Silver Chair.”

The three “Narnia” films have grossed a combined $1.6 billion worldwide.

“Like many readers, both young and old, I am a huge fan of C.S. Lewis’s beautiful and allegorical world of Narnia,” Gordon said. “These fantasy stories inspire real-world passion among millions of devoted fans around the world. As we prepare to bring the next book to life, we are humbled and excited to contribute to the outstanding legacy of Narnia.”

Gordon and Douglas Gresham will produce along with Vincent Sieber of the C.S. Lewis Co. Michele Wolkoff and Sara Smith will oversee for The Mark Gordon Company.

“The Chronicles of Narnia” began with the publication of “The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe” in 1950, followed by the prequel, “The Magician’s Nephew,” and the sequels, “The Horse and His Boy,” “Prince Caspian,” “The Voyage of the Dawn Treader,” “The Silver Chair” and “The Last Battle.”

Disney produced and released the first two “Narnia” films starting with “The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe” in 2005 and “Prince Caspian” in 2008. Fox handled “Dawn Treader” in 2011.

The first “Narnia” was a surprise success with $745 million in worldwide box office. “Prince Caspian” took in $420 million and “Dawn Treader” grossed $415 million.

Gordon’s movie credits include “Source Code,” “Saving Private Ryan,” “The Patriot” and “Speed.”  Television credits include “Grey’s Anatomy” (ABC), “Ray Donovan (Showtime),” “Private Practice” (ABC), “Criminal Minds” (CBS), and “Army Wives” (Lifetime/ABC).

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  1. Amy Pond in the TARDIS says:

    …in the end, though, he still meant it as a representation of Christianity. I mean, a.) It’s obvious without Lewis’s statement, b.) The statement you provide says just that, and c.) Lewis was a major Christian writer. So I’m not sure I see the problem here.

    • You are right, I was just being picky. I don’t really think it’s a problem. I just thought it was just a little ironic that he used the word “allegorical” since Lewis was so careful to avoid it in relation to Narnia and so definite about it’s meaning.

      In a worst case scenario, if a producer did actually think that Lewis wrote his books allegorically then the end result might come out saying precisely the things that Lewis deliberately did not want to say. But, to be fair, that’s very unlikely.

  2. Lewis specifically denied that the stories were allegorical:

    “You are mistaken when you think that everything in the books ‘represents’ something in this world. Things do that in The Pilgrim’s Progress but I’m not writing in that way. I did not say to myself ‘Let us represent Jesus as He really is in our world by a Lion in Narnia’: I said, ‘Let us suppose that there were a land like Narnia and that the Son of God, as he became a Man in our world, became a Lion there, and then imagine what would happen.’

    I hope that Mark Gordon figures out why it mattered to Lewis to make the distinction before he begins production!

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