Quincy’s Cues, and All That Jazz

A look back at the films of 'Q'

Quincy Jones wasn’t the first black composer to score a studio film (that honor belongs to Duke Ellington on ‘Anatomy of a Murder’). But it was Jones who really broke the color barrier for composers in Hollywood in 1965, and his jazz chops altered the sound of American movies. Among his best work:

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    Quincy Jones wasn’t the first black composer to score a studio film (that honor belongs to Duke Ellington on ‘Anatomy of a Murder’). But it was Jones who really broke the color barrier for composers in Hollywood in 1965, and his jazz chops altered the sound of American movies. Among his best work:

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    Quincy Jones wasn’t the first black composer to score a studio film (that honor belongs to Duke Ellington on ‘Anatomy of a Murder’). But it was Jones who really broke the color barrier for composers in Hollywood in 1965, and his jazz chops altered the sound of American movies. Among his best work:

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