Hudes scores Pulitzer

Playwright wins for 'Water'

Quiara Alegria Hudes has scored the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for drama for her play “Water by the Spoonful,” which bowed in the fall at Hartford Stage in Connecticut.

Scribe has been a Pulitzer finalist twice before, once for her play “Elliot, A Soldier’s Fugue” in 2007 and once for the book of musical “In the Heights,” co-written with Lin-Manuel Miranda, in 2009.

“Water by the Spoonful” is the second of three plays in a trilogy that began with “Elliot.” Storyline follows a Iraq war veteran easing back into daily life in Philadelphia, with the Pulitzer committee describing the tale as “an imaginative play about the search for meaning.”

“Water,” which has so far only been produced in Hartford, does not yet have a future production lined up, although Gotham looks poised to be the next step, particularly now with the added cache of the Pulitzer win. The third play in Hudes’ trilogy, “The Happiest Song Plays Last,” is on tap to have its world preem as part of the 2012-13 season at Chicago’s Goodman Theater next spring.

The Pulitzer win for Hudes reps something of a surprise for New York legiters, who widely expected Jon Robin Baitz’s “Other Desert Cities” to take the prize. That play, currently on Broadway, was named a finalist this year, as was Stephen Karam’s “Sons of the Prophet,” which was produced Off Broadway last year by the Roundabout Theater Company.

Award comes with a check for $10,000. Only plays that opened during the 2011 calendar year were eligible for the 2012 kudo.

Last year the award went to Bruce Norris’ “Clybourne Park,” which had a 2010 preem Off Broadway and is currently in previews on Broadway, where the show opens later this week.

This year the Pulitzer’s arts awards in other categories went to Stephen Greenblatt’s “The Swerve: How the World Became Modern” for general nonfiction, Kevin Puts’ “Silent Night: Opera in Two Acts” for music and Tracy K. Smith’s “Life on Mars” for poetry. No fiction award was given this year.

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