You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

Unconditional

Cliches and contrivances abound in "Unconditional," a faith-based drama about redemption and renewal that is blessed with the saving graces of persuasive performances, handsome production values and some undeniably affecting moments of spiritual uplift.

Cast:
With: Lynn Collins, Michael Ealy, Bruce McGill, Kwesi Boakye, Diego Klattenhoff, Cedric Pendleton, Joanne Morgan, Danielle Lewis, Gabriella Phillips.

Cliches and contrivances abound in “Unconditional,” a faith-based drama about redemption and renewal that is blessed with the saving graces of persuasive performances, handsome production values and some undeniably affecting moments of spiritual uplift. Inspired by the real-life activities of “Papa Joe” Bradford — a Nashville community leader and founder of Elijah’s Heart, a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping underprivileged children and their families — the pic could generate enough favorable word of mouth during and after limited theatrical play to sustain an extended homevid shelf life.

To provide a p.o.v. for his fact-based scenario, helmer-scripter Brent McCorkle relies heavily on a fictional character: Samantha “Sam” Crawford (Lynn Collins), a children’s author who plummets into depression after her beloved husband is fatally shot during an inner-city street mugging.

Pic begins with Sam preparing to shoot herself at the exact spot where her husband was murdered — and just happens to be in the right place at the right time to witness Keisha (Gabriella Phillips), a mute little girl, getting struck by a hit-and-run driver.

Shocked out of her suicidal funk, Sam rushes to assist the injured child, and winds up accompanying Keisha and Macon (Kwesi Boakye), the girl’s brother, to a hospital. There, Sam just happens to run into a childhood friend, Joe Bradford (Michael Ealy), an ex-con who has dedicated his post-prison life to helping underprivileged kids like Keisha and Macon.

Eager to help his buddy rebuild her shattered life, Joe encourages Sam to involve herself in his efforts to mentor at-risk kids. But even as Sam begins to bond with the children helped by “Papa Joe,” she notices that Keisha and Macon just happen to live next door to a mechanic (Cedric Pendleton) who fits the description of a prime suspect in her husband’s killing.

When McCorkle isn’t busy ladling on coincidences, he allows his two well-cast leads enough room to earn sympathy and occasionally tug heartstrings with well-detailed, emotionally resonant performances. Collins gets noticeably more screen time, but Ealy, thanks in part to his character’s dicey medical condition, is every bit as compelling.

McCorkle also encourages impressive work from lenser Michael Regalbuto, who skillfully employs varieties of color to underscore contrasts between the warmly inviting sanctuary of Sam’s farm, where Joe and the kids enjoy a pleasant and plot-propulsive overnight visit, and the cold hues of Nashville’s meaner streets.

Child actors Phillips and Boakye are appealingly unaffected, while Bruce McGill effectively underplays his few scenes as a case-hardened cop who insists, not too convincingly, that he’s not a racist. Pic’s religious undercurrents reach flood tide only during the final minutes, when a character gives glory to God in so exuberant a manner that even agnostics in the audience may share a bit of the excitement.

Unconditional

Production: A Harbinger Media Partners release and presentation in association with Veracity Moving Pictures of a Free to Love production. Produced by Jason Atkins, J. Wesley Legg. Executive producer, Shannon Atkins. Co-producers, John Gray, Darren Moorman, Joe Bradford. Directed, written by Brent McCorkle.

Crew: Camera (color), Michael Regalbuto; editor, McCorkle; music, Mark Petrie, McCorkle; production designer, Kay Lee; art director, Ladrell James; costume designer, Jade Rain; sound (Dolby Digital/SDDS), Dr. One; associate producer, Kim McCorkle; assistant director, Harold Uhl; casting, Sunday Boling, Meg Morman. Reviewed at AMC Loews Fountains 18, Houston, Sept. 21, 2012. MPAA Rating: PG-13. Running time: 97 MIN.

With: With: Lynn Collins, Michael Ealy, Bruce McGill, Kwesi Boakye, Diego Klattenhoff, Cedric Pendleton, Joanne Morgan, Danielle Lewis, Gabriella Phillips.

More Film

  • Festival of Disruption

    David Lynch's Festival of Disruption Unites 'Peaks' Cultists in Meditation Talk and Musical Mayhem

    Cliches and contrivances abound in “Unconditional,” a faith-based drama about redemption and renewal that is blessed with the saving graces of persuasive performances, handsome production values and some undeniably affecting moments of spiritual uplift. Inspired by the real-life activities of “Papa Joe” Bradford — a Nashville community leader and founder of Elijah’s Heart, a nonprofit […]

  • Selma Blair

    Selma Blair's Production Company to Adapt Novel 'The Lost' Into Movie (EXCLUSIVE)

    Cliches and contrivances abound in “Unconditional,” a faith-based drama about redemption and renewal that is blessed with the saving graces of persuasive performances, handsome production values and some undeniably affecting moments of spiritual uplift. Inspired by the real-life activities of “Papa Joe” Bradford — a Nashville community leader and founder of Elijah’s Heart, a nonprofit […]

  • Christopher Nolan Dunkirk

    Film News Roundup: Christopher Nolan to Discuss Film Preservation at Library of Congress

    Cliches and contrivances abound in “Unconditional,” a faith-based drama about redemption and renewal that is blessed with the saving graces of persuasive performances, handsome production values and some undeniably affecting moments of spiritual uplift. Inspired by the real-life activities of “Papa Joe” Bradford — a Nashville community leader and founder of Elijah’s Heart, a nonprofit […]

  • Busan: Helmer Farooki Sets December Shoot

    Busan: Helmer Farooki Sets December Shoot for 'Saturday Afternoon'

    Cliches and contrivances abound in “Unconditional,” a faith-based drama about redemption and renewal that is blessed with the saving graces of persuasive performances, handsome production values and some undeniably affecting moments of spiritual uplift. Inspired by the real-life activities of “Papa Joe” Bradford — a Nashville community leader and founder of Elijah’s Heart, a nonprofit […]

  • Director Nonzee Niminbutr Blends History With

    Cult Thai Director Blends History With Whodunnit in ‘Francis Chit’

    Cliches and contrivances abound in “Unconditional,” a faith-based drama about redemption and renewal that is blessed with the saving graces of persuasive performances, handsome production values and some undeniably affecting moments of spiritual uplift. Inspired by the real-life activities of “Papa Joe” Bradford — a Nashville community leader and founder of Elijah’s Heart, a nonprofit […]

  • Kross Pictures Finds Fertile Ground in

    Busan: Kross Pictures Finds Fertile Ground in India-Korea Remakes

    Cliches and contrivances abound in “Unconditional,” a faith-based drama about redemption and renewal that is blessed with the saving graces of persuasive performances, handsome production values and some undeniably affecting moments of spiritual uplift. Inspired by the real-life activities of “Papa Joe” Bradford — a Nashville community leader and founder of Elijah’s Heart, a nonprofit […]

  • First-time Helmer Hirose Nanako at Asian

    First-time Helmer Hirose Nanako at Asian Project Market With 'Dawn'

    Cliches and contrivances abound in “Unconditional,” a faith-based drama about redemption and renewal that is blessed with the saving graces of persuasive performances, handsome production values and some undeniably affecting moments of spiritual uplift. Inspired by the real-life activities of “Papa Joe” Bradford — a Nashville community leader and founder of Elijah’s Heart, a nonprofit […]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content