Like a four-part panel of images with tenuous connections, Weston Currie's "The Perception of Moving Targets" is a personal art film whose meaning, as the title suggests, is in the eye of the beholder.

Like a four-part panel of images with tenuous connections, Weston Currie’s “The Perception of Moving Targets” is a personal art film whose meaning, as the title suggests, is in the eye of the beholder. Each of the pic’s sections is driven by nightmares and memories both ethereal and material, but cinematic interest (generated by such devices as the alternating aspect ratios) is deflated by an obtrusively amateurish approach to staging and editing. After a Sundance New Frontier launch, this piece of Maya Deren Lite could land at radically inclined festivals outside North America.

Opening segment concerns a girl (Brighid Thomas, looking more mature than the average teen) running for her high-school track team, but mentally beset by doubts and a recurring nightmare involving a dark, cloaked presence in her bedroom. This presence seems to fuse with her scary-looking dad, who serves her an awfully weird breakfast. Other sections are shorter in running time and leave no lasting impression; although they’re montages illustrating paranoia and mortality, they lack essential visual or sensual impact. What does linger is the use of the title song from “Bonjour Tristesse” and Supertramp’s “Dreamer.”

The Perception of Moving Targets

Production

A Watcher Films presentation. Produced by Weston Currie, Lincoln Holmes. Directed, written, edited by Weston Currie.

Crew

Camera (color, DV), Wyatt Garfield; music, Grouper; production designer, Erin Staub; costume designer, Jin Camou. Reviewed at Sundance Film Festival (New Frontier), Jan. 25, 2012. Running time: 77 MIN.

With

Brighid Thomas, Cherie Blackfeather, Gerald Casey, Erin Gwynn, Poppy Iannotti, Tom Wood, Jin Camou, Daniel Wilson.

Filed Under:

Follow @Variety on Twitter for breaking news, reviews and more