CES Daily Spotlight: Future of 3D

As the television manufacturing industry struggles to persuade consumers that 3D is the future, the videogame industry is having a little easier time of it.

Several of the hottest games of 2011 were 3D-compatible. Some, like Sony’s “Uncharted 3: Drake’s Deception,” made a convincing case that the technology could add to the gaming experience and wasn’t just a gimmick. And after a sluggish start, Nintendo’s 3DS has, seemingly, finally found its footing.With the one-two punch of a price cut and a strong holiday slate of games, the 3DS surpassed first year sales of the Nintendo DS in just eight months. (The DS went on to be the bestselling game system of all time in the U.S.) Nintendo now estimates 3DS unit sales should top 4 million units by February.

Sony, meanwhile, is hoping to jumpstart interest with its PlayStation 3D display and graphics company Nvidia works actively with developers of PC games to include 3D elements in their titles.

The future of 3D, however, may not lie in stereoscopic displays. Research is already under way on free-floating 3D objects — essentially holograms — with gaming applications. ViZoo, based in Denmark, already has a prototype running. It’s early still, but if successful, it could take the interactive nature that is now becoming standard (with the Wii controller and Kinect) to the next level.

CES Daily Spotlight: The Future of 3D
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