Protestors target the rich in 'Millionaire's March'

Media from all over New York and the world turned out in force Tuesday afternoon as the “Occupy Wall Street” protest conducted its Millionaires March, streaming into the wealthiest neighborhoods on Park Avenue to picket the houses of moneyed Gothamites including Rupert Murdoch and David Koch.

The group left a trail of satellite trucks from 59th Street up into the 80s, where demonstrators stopped briefly in front of properties of billionaires who had received taxpayer money or exerted political influence.

“It’s really interesting this is happening in New York,” said Nafiz Albayrak of Turkish news service Dogan News Agency. “The protesters want radical change. We haven’t seen that before.” Korean network Seoul Broadcasting System had a presence at the protest, as did other foreign news agencies, many of which offered perspectives not found in the American media. Chinese government news service Xinhua News Agency reported that the protests “reveal Americans’ anger over economic injustice.”

And of course, New York news agencies were out in force, as well, with a battalion of photographers and cameramen standing across the street each time the police halted the crowd to let cars through. WNYC, WCBS, and WABC all had coverage of the protest at various stages, starting down in Zuccotti Park, where the Occupy demonstrators have built a encampment-cum-headquarters, and moving north.

The protesters have received support from unions across the country, including the WGA, Communications Workers of America, the Gotham branch of the AFL-CIO. “731, 731, baby!” shouted a hard-hatted Teamster at work on 78th Street as the protest passed.

At each residence, protesters attempted to leave a giant, Publishers Clearinghouse-style check for $5 billion made out to “The 1%” and signed “the 99%.” Like an upside-down tour of the stars’ homes, the protest visited one of Murdoch’s Gotham apartments, one of GOP billionaires who had received taxpayer money or exerted political influence.

“It’s really interesting this is happening in New York,” said Nafiz Albayrak of Turkish news service Dogan News Agency. “The protesters want radical change. We haven’t seen that before.” Korean network Seoul Broadcasting System had a presence at the protest, as did other foreign news agencies, many of which offered perspectives not found in the American media. Chinese government news service Xinhua News Agency reported that the protests “reveal Americans’ anger over economic injustice.”

The protesters have received support from unions across the country, including the WGA, Communications Workers of America, the Gotham branch of the AFL-CIO. “731, 731, baby!” shouted a hard-hatted Teamster at work on 78th Street as the protest passed.

At each residence, protesters attempted to leave a giant, Publishers Clearinghouse-style check for $5 billion made out to “The 1%” and signed “the 99%.” Like an upside-down tour of the stars’ homes, the protest visited one of Murdoch’s Gotham apartments, one of GOP financier David Koch’s residences, and properties owned by Howard Milstein, John Paulson and Jamie Dimon — all bankers at companies that received federal funds during the bailout.

Making up the three-blocks-long group of activists was a marching band, several teachers, a slew of students from New York’s many colleges and universities, and plenty of unemployed folks.

“I earned these at the Brooklyn Bridge,” one young man told Variety, brandishing a broken pair of zip-tie handcuffs and chanting “show me what democracy looks like!” (“this is what democracy looks like!” came the response). More than 700 protesters were arrested on the Brooklyn Bridge earlier this month. “I snuck ‘em out at the precinct.”

Placards ranged in tone from the gentle — “We just want peace!” — to the severe — “Pay your share.”

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